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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to see if anyone has fixed the issue or has a viable solution with the "eating" of/through ignition coils. I went through about 10 pages worth of ignition coil problems within the forum and other sites and there doesn't seem to be a solution given or at least none that I could see. I'm currently dealing with a p0301 code. I started off with a p0305 which I wound up putting in new plugs and getting that cylinders coil replaced. Several days later, I get the p0301 code. I've read online that even the Nissan dealerships aren't sure as to why the cars are "eating" through coils and computers. I've checked for grounding issues and can't find any. Does the 05 Altima have an Ignition Condensor Coil and if so can this also be a culprit? Doesn't seem to be a whole lot of information pertaining to this since everything seems to default back to Ignition Coil replacement. Any help would be extremel appreciated and welcomed. Thanks for the help in advance.
 

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09 Altima 3.5SE 6MT Sedan
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The ECU controls the 'switching' of the coils to generate the voltage needed for the spark. A poor ground, or wear/corrosion at the coil connector would add resistance which can add significant voltage during the di/dt event that creates the voltage spike that makes the spark. The coil windings would then break down over time if repeatedly subjected to voltages above their insulation rating (let's say the spark voltage is 25kV and the insulation is rated to 30kV, but a poor ground means the coil itself sees 35kV or more on every discharge...eventually the coil starts to break down internally...a few windings at a time (so a few volts each), until it can no longer reliably generate a spark strong enough to prevent a misfire which then throws a code. You are chasing electrical gremlins for sure, but replacing the coil harness and cleaning all ECU grounds would be a great first salvo...

One other thing to check is for carbon tracing on the coil ends that mate with the plugs. This can be internal as well as external, but it's worth a try to wipe down the coil-on-plug assembly with some solvent just to make sure it' isn't some external contaminant that's shunting your spark and causing the misfire.
 

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#1 suspect is a ground issue.
Verify ground cable from driver side transmission to body( below battery)
and from body to battery.
I honestly added a extra one on mine from the battery to the bracket atop the engine.
Have not replaced a coil since.
My 03 was eating coils.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Update. Found the negative battery cable that connects to the frame to be corroded and where it connects to the motor to be both corroded and broken off. The negative cable was able 20 inches long and at about 13 inches, the covering had been removed, crimped together with a metal piece, and bolted onto the frame. Probably why the car always started, since it had a ground, but where my grounding issues were occuring. Replaced cable and cleaned off the areas it connected to. Replaced all 6 coils on plugs. Hopefully, that fixes my grounding issue.

Also, took off the ignition coil condenser (not even the nissan dealership in my area knew what the piece was nor how much it would cost, I might add) due to corrosion and a few post on the site stating that was a culprit. Searched online and found a part number and pictures to be sure and ordered it. The one I have is corroded and burnt.

I cant seem to think of any logical explaination as to why the parts department at the dealership wouldn't know what the part is or why they quoted it to be an $800 part.
 

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Great to gear.
There was no covering and the cable was crimped originally:(
Can you please post a picture and part number for the condenser.
I am confident your issues will be no more
 

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The ECU controls the 'switching' of the coils to generate the voltage needed for the spark. A poor ground, or wear/corrosion at the coil connector would add resistance which can add significant voltage during the di/dt event that creates the voltage spike that makes the spark. The coil windings would then break down over time if repeatedly subjected to voltages above their insulation rating (let's say the spark voltage is 25kV and the insulation is rated to 30kV, but a poor ground means the coil itself sees 35kV or more on every discharge...eventually the coil starts to break down internally...a few windings at a time (so a few volts each), until it can no longer reliably generate a spark strong enough to prevent a misfire which then throws a code. You are chasing electrical gremlins for sure, but replacing the coil harness and cleaning all ECU grounds would be a great first salvo...

One other thing to check is for carbon tracing on the coil ends that mate with the plugs. This can be internal as well as external, but it's worth a try to wipe down the coil-on-plug assembly with some solvent just to make sure it' isn't some external contaminant that's shunting your spark and causing the misfire.
Wow, reading this reply gave me an idea as to why I'm getting the P0113 code high circuit to Mass Airflow Sensor. I just changed my plugs, ignition coils, & valve cover (my spark plug wells were filling with oil). I have a pretty significant shaking at idle- I swore I would have a cylinder misfire but I didn't get that code, instead I got the MAS code. Wonder could a ground problem by my issue as well.?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry for taking so long to respond. Been pretty busy. Unfortunately, I was not able to take a picture of the fantastic job that was my negative cable. My issues with the coils seem to be resolved though. The car is running real smooth.
 

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09 Altima 3.5SE 6MT Sedan
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