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I i have a 07 2.5 s with 102k and using 5w30 but its getting super cold in the northeast area and the car starts making strange knocking noise during cold start ups. It doesn't do it when its warm outside. Some people say its normal some say i need to use thicker oil like 10w 30. Im due for an oil change so will 0w30 help the noise or will it make it worse? I want to use 0w30 only during winter seasons and it does go below 0 sometimes but most of the time its lower 10 and 20 degrees.
 

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I i have a 07 2.5 s with 102k and using 5w30 but its getting super cold in the northeast area and the car starts making strange knocking noise during cold start ups. It doesn't do it when its warm outside. Some people say its normal some say i need to use thicker oil like 10w 30. Im due for an oil change so will 0w30 help the noise or will it make it worse? I want to use 0w30 only during winter seasons and it does go below 0 sometimes but most of the time its lower 10 and 20 degrees.
The recommended standard motor oil is 5W-30. However in freezing conditions, you can use a 0W-30 oil which is lower viscosity and will flow easier so it should quiet down the cold engine startup.
 

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Does your knocking sound last long? cuz it's a kinda normal thing for a knocking sound in cold condition. If it does, I suppose it has little to do with 5w 30. and i dont think 10w 30 or 0w 30 would help cuz they perform better in hotter condition, which doesn't suit your situation.
 

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Does your knocking sound last long? cuz it's a kinda normal thing for a knocking sound in cold condition. If it does, I suppose it has little to do with 5w 30. and i dont think 10w 30 or 0w 30 would help cuz they perform better in hotter condition, which doesn't suit your situation.
Please share your knowledge of tribology, and your mistaken belief that 0W-30 performs better in hot weather than 5W-30.

Do you also believe that 0W-30 performs worse in cold weather than 5W-30 does?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Does your knocking sound last long? cuz it's a kinda normal thing for a knocking sound in cold condition. If it does, I suppose it has little to do with 5w 30. and i dont think 10w 30 or 0w 30 would help cuz they perform better in hotter condition, which doesn't suit your situation.
The sound dies down once its warm up but if u listen hard enough its still there and 0w30 is thinner than 5w30 which i would only use it during winter. I just want to know if anyone used 0w30 during winter and it stop the noises during cold start ups.
 

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The sound dies down once its warm up but if u listen hard enough its still there and 0w30 is thinner than 5w30 which i would only use it during winter. I just want to know if anyone used 0w30 during winter and it stop the noises during cold start ups.
Why don't you try 0W-30 and see for yourself if the noises stop? 0W-30 will not harm your engine.

Are you aware that at normal operational engine temperatures 0W-30 and 5W-30 are the same viscosity...neither is thicker or thinner than the other.

Take the time to read up on what the "W" on SAE motor oil means.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why don't you try 0W-30 and see for yourself if the noises stop? 0W-30 will not harm your engine.

Are you aware that at normal operational engine temperatures that 0W-30 and 5W-30 are the same viscosity...neither is thicker or thinner than the other.

Take the time to read up on what the "W" on SAE motor oil means.
Yes i know that's why if ppl say it won't damage the the engine since its 15 plus years old and don't know if its sensitive to thinner oil i would use it until it gets warm again around spring that's when I'll go back to 5w30.
 

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Yes i know that's why if ppl say it won't damage the the engine since its 15 plus years old and don't know if its sensitive to thinner oil i would use it until it gets warm again around spring that's when I'll go back to 5w30.
Again I ask, do you believe that 0W-30 oil is thinner than 5W-30 oil?
 

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“W” stands for “winter.” When oil grades are hyphenated (i.e. 10W-30), this indicates range of viscosity attainable with this particular oil, namely it behaves like 10 weight oil (less viscous) when it is cold or “winter” and thanks to viscosity modifiers (manufacturer added oil additives), it will behave like 30 weight oil (more viscous) when hot.


Full synthetic 0W-30 motor oil has been liquid engineered to flow like 0 Weight oil in winter temperatures, but to have the viscosity of a 30 Weight engine oil once full operating temperature has been achieved. This ensures a high level of engine protection from the moment you turn on the ignition.

You might think that the 'W' in a motor oil's viscosity description stands for Weight, but that's just a common misconception. It actually stands for Winter. That's because 0W-30 engine oil is formulated to flow like a 0 Weight oil in cold conditions, yet offer the protection of a 30 Weight motor oil when the engine reaches its full operating temperature.

More information about motor oil:


 

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“W” stands for “winter.” When oil grades are hyphenated (i.e. 10W-30), this indicates range of viscosity attainable with this particular oil, namely it behaves like 10 weight oil (less viscous) when it is cold or “winter” and thanks to viscosity modifiers (manufacturer added oil additives), it will behave like 30 weight oil (more viscous) when hot.


Full synthetic 0W-30 motor oil has been liquid engineered to flow like 0 Weight oil in winter temperatures, but to have the viscosity of a 30 Weight engine oil once full operating temperature has been achieved. This ensures a high level of engine protection from the moment you turn on the ignition.

You might think that the 'W' in a motor oil's viscosity description stands for Weight, but that's just a common misconception. It actually stands for Winter. That's because 0W-30 engine oil is formulated to flow like a 0 Weight oil in cold conditions, yet offer the protection of a 30 Weight motor oil when the engine reaches its full operating temperature.

More information about motor oil:


great job @Throckmorton
you give a detailed and convencing answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
“W” stands for “winter.” When oil grades are hyphenated (i.e. 10W-30), this indicates range of viscosity attainable with this particular oil, namely it behaves like 10 weight oil (less viscous) when it is cold or “winter” and thanks to viscosity modifiers (manufacturer added oil additives), it will behave like 30 weight oil (more viscous) when hot.


Full synthetic 0W-30 motor oil has been liquid engineered to flow like 0 Weight oil in winter temperatures, but to have the viscosity of a 30 Weight engine oil once full operating temperature has been achieved. This ensures a high level of engine protection from the moment you turn on the ignition.

You might think that the 'W' in a motor oil's viscosity description stands for Weight, but that's just a common misconception. It actually stands for Winter. That's because 0W-30 engine oil is formulated to flow like a 0 Weight oil in cold conditions, yet offer the protection of a 30 Weight motor oil when the engine reaches its full operating temperature.

More information about motor oil:


Fine I'll just use the the manufacturer recommended 5w30 then
 

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FWIW...........when you have a multi-vis oil the true oil weight is the LOWER number. In a 5W-30 oil the real weight began with a 5 weight base oil, then additives are added to raise the viscosity while the oil is hot. What that means is that if you are running the oil till dead, when the additives wear out, you are running closer to a 5 weight than you are a 30 weight.
 
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