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Discussion Starter #1
Good Day

Hope all is well and safe on your side,

I drive a Nissan Murano and I added a towbar from Bosal, roughly some 50+KGS and I feel the back of the vehicle heavier and lost some clearance from the tyres to the fenders, I have another set of coils springs that are stiffer than the Originals, would these coils damage my shocks (considering the extra towbar weight)??

I changed my shocks last month to KYB GAS XCEL, when I did it I also fitted the stiffer coil springs but then after 2 days the new KYB rear shocks busted the seal, was told it was because of the coils so I fitted another set of new rear coils + the normal springs,

The stiffer springs have the same height and width has the softer one, difference is in the number of rings (stiffer one has more rings than softer one)

Thanks,
 

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Struts and Shocks are in the vehicle to slow down suspension travel. Increasing spring rates or stiffness just means the shocks/struts are not going to be moving as much. IF the shocks/struts are of poor quality, the "vibration" effect of a stiffer spring can in theory cause the internal dampening to weaken, but it will not "blow out a seal".

Changing the HEIGHT of the springs is a whole different story. IF you make the springs taller or shorter and do not change the over-all length of the shock/strut to match, you will damage the shocks/struts fairly quickly. I highly advise AGAINST increasing your rear spring rate only. This will dramatically change the handling characteristics of an already top heavy vehicle. A stiffer rear end will make the vehicle want to slide around under cornering which can lead to a pretty nasty accident.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Struts and Shocks are in the vehicle to slow down suspension travel. Increasing spring rates or stiffness just means the shocks/struts are not going to be moving as much. IF the shocks/struts are of poor quality, the "vibration" effect of a stiffer spring can in theory cause the internal dampening to weaken, but it will not "blow out a seal".

Changing the HEIGHT of the springs is a whole different story. IF you make the springs taller or shorter and do not change the over-all length of the shock/strut to match, you will damage the shocks/struts fairly quickly. I highly advise AGAINST increasing your rear spring rate only. This will dramatically change the handling characteristics of an already top heavy vehicle. A stiffer rear end will make the vehicle want to slide around under cornering which can lead to a pretty nasty accident.

Good Day,

Thanks for the reply,

The springs are the same height, one has less rings and the other has more,
I added the towbar and the weight of the tow bar is making the vehicle bounce a bit on the rear and it slightly lowered the back,
So I want to add the stiffer springs to compensate for the added weight and restore vehicle height,
 

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Good Day,

Thanks for the reply,

The springs are the same height, one has less rings and the other has more,
I added the towbar and the weight of the tow bar is making the vehicle bounce a bit on the rear and it slightly lowered the back,
So I want to add the stiffer springs to compensate for the added weight and restore vehicle height,
your towing. the vehicle is going to sag. Trucks made for towing sag with weight in the rear. Changing out the springs for when you may tow for a few days at the risk of changing how the vehicle handles when not towing, really is not worth the danger IMO. Also: More coils does not mean stiffer springs. Spring stiffness is based on several characteristics of the springs: Spring material, spring coil thickness, spring coil material thickness, type of heat treatment, coil spacing (progressive spring rate vs standard spring rate). You can have a spring with 10 times the coils of the stock one, and it could very well be softer than the oem one.
 

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your towing. the vehicle is going to sag. Trucks made for towing sag with weight in the rear. Changing out the springs for when you may tow for a few days at the risk of changing how the vehicle handles when not towing, really is not worth the danger IMO. Also: More coils does not mean stiffer springs. Spring stiffness is based on several characteristics of the springs: Spring material, spring coil thickness, spring coil material thickness, type of heat treatment, coil spacing (progressive spring rate vs standard spring rate). You can have a spring with 10 times the coils of the stock one, and it could very well be softer than the oem one.
Thanks for the quick reply,
I will keep your comments in my head, really appreciate it,
 
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