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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I use to have a older Altima and the engine would hold redline as long as the gas pedal was held to the floor. My new Altima has a shift (like a non CVT) to the transmission in both "D" and "DS", is this normal?

Thanks for any information.
 

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I use to have a older Altima and the engine would hold redline as long as the gas pedal was held to the floor. My new Altima has a shift (like a non CVT) to the transmission in both "D" and "DS", is this normal?

Thanks for any information.
"Is this normal?" Yes.

Your Owner's manual page 5-14

Ds (DriveSport)mode-Move the shift lever from D(Drive)to the Ds (DriveSport).The position indicator in the meter shows “Ds”. In Ds (Drive Sport) mode, transmission operation changes to Sporty driving shift operation, creating a more aggressive acceleration feeling than the D(Drive)mode and a gear change sensation when the driver accelerates or when using the shift paddles (if so equipped). During Ds (DriveSport)mode operation, the driver must move the shift lever from Ds mode to D mode and back again to re-select Ds (Drive Sport) mode.
 

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It's normal in Ds, but it shouldn't happen in D. My 2013 revs up and holds RPMs at a set point if you floor it. If it doesn't do that, there's no point in having a CVT that holds RPMs in the "sweet spot" for acceleration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes 15951 that is what I was thinking and that's the way my old Altima worked. I was told by the dealer they work different now, so I was hoping to find another 2016 user and get their input. Throckmorton yes I read the manual but it really does not describe normal mode. Or at least I don't understand.
 

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I think all new nissans have "step logic" because of all the complaints of cvt drone. Even in D if a certain amount of throttle % is applied it simulates shifts. It should still act like a regular cvt when light throttle is applied.
 

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Yes 15951 that is what I was thinking and that's the way my old Altima worked. I was told by the dealer they work different now, so I was hoping to find another 2016 user and get their input. Throckmorton yes I read the manual but it really does not describe normal mode. Or at least I don't understand.
Help me understand this...what input are you looking for from other 2016 owners?

Your car CVT "shifts" as you have described, the dealer told you that this is now how the latest generation CVT operates...but somehow, you think something is wrong with your car?

Are you unhappy with your car?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm not trying to be a wise guy but what got all this started was when I very first test drove the 2016 Altima the CVT worked just like I thought a CVT should work. Hit Redline and stayed there. But now even in "D" mode the CVT shifts. With a "Ds" mode on the gear selector, I guess I was thinking "D" mode would work like a old model CVT (no shifting) and "Ds" would stimulate shifting. My first thought was the car was stuck in "Ds" mode. On the first test drive if the car "shifted" this question would have never came up. No I'm not unhappy just trying to understand "how things work"
 

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A little late with a reply but yes, my 2016 has shift points in both D and D3 modes. D3 shift points are more aggressive and noticeable however.
 

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A little late with a reply but yes, my 2016 has shift points in both D and D3 modes. D3 shift points are more aggressive and noticeable however.
Interesting. So Nissan is now programming the CVT software to artificially "shift" regardless of mode, which should result in slower acceleration at WOT. I'm sure they did this to pacify the idiots bringing their cars in for troubleshooting the CVT because it "hangs at redline".

The next step in this flawed thought process is to mimic shifts at all times, which logically leads to dumping the CVT and going back to a conventional automatic transmission.
 

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Interesting. So Nissan is now programming the CVT software to artificially "shift" regardless of mode, which should result in slower acceleration at WOT. I'm sure they did this to pacify the idiots bringing their cars in for troubleshooting the CVT because it "hangs at redline".

The next step in this flawed thought process is to mimic shifts at all times, which logically leads to dumping the CVT and going back to a conventional automatic transmission.


Sorry I meant to type Ds mode instead of D3 but yes, it feels "more like" a typical shifting transmission most of the time though it shifts really fast and is a narrow shift band. I am thinking that there is very little performance loss.
 

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Sorry I meant to type Ds mode instead of D3 but yes, it feels "more like" a typical shifting transmission most of the time though it shifts really fast and is a narrow shift band. I am thinking that there is very little performance loss.
Crap, I've been driving the CVT since 2013 and now I'm used to it. Driving a regular automatic seems strange now. At this point I think it would feel "primitive" to feel it simulate a shift point, almost like there is something wrong with it. :|
 

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Crap, I've been driving the CVT since 2013 and now I'm used to it. Driving a regular automatic seems strange now. At this point I think it would feel "primitive" to feel it simulate a shift point, almost like there is something wrong with it. :|
There is something wrong with it. They're intentionally dumbing down the transmission so that people can feel "shifts".
 

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There is something wrong with it. They're intentionally dumbing down the transmission so that people can feel "shifts".
Wrong...but partially correct.


Why The 2015 Nissan Murano's 'Gearless' CVT Feels Like It's Shifting
Why? Call it driver-seat comfort food; gears are simply more satisfying, and they more closely correspond to the sounds and sensations of vehicle speed and acceleration that we're used to.

However, for the 2015 model year, several models are getting a software update to make their CVTs a bit more like a conventional automatic.

The system forces the transmission to "hold a ratio and then shift" to simulate the way that a traditional automatic would. It's simply a change in software, but the company "can't do it to older CVTs," he said, because it would require changes to transmission logic, as well
Interestingly, buyer perception appears to be pushing the upgrade. John Curl, a Nissan North America regional product manager, told Automotive News that the decision to add the tech partially comes because some owners are bothered that the CVTs aren't changing gears. According to Powers, D-Step "avoids the rubber band feel," that many drivers didn't like.
Nissan alters all CVTs to act less like a stretched rubberband

Nissan Adds Faux Shift Feel to All CVTs for 2015 » AutoGuide.com News

The technology helps create the sensation that a CVT is shifting gears like a traditional automatic transmission even though it isn’t. Of all the automakers in the world, the Nissan leads the way with CVT use and is hoping D-Step Shift logic not only helps respond to critics of the technology, but help cut down on mistaken complaints that the transmission is failing when it feels as if it isn’t changing gears.
The software changes in the D-Step Shift logic technology causes the CVT to jump ahead slightly in the gear ratios around 4,000 RPMs and helps create a subtle momentary drop in driving force to give it a sense of a gear change.

D-Step Shift Logic to Make Nissan CVT Shift Like an Automatic Transmission

thanks to a software update baptized D-Step Shift Logic. This minor intervention will create the impression that the CVT is actually shifting through gears, like an actual automatic gearbox. Once the engine reaches 4,000 revolutions per minute, the new software commands the electronic brain of the Xtronic CVT gearbox to create a subtle drop in driving force and a slight jump ahead.

Using computer software, the D Step simulates the shift points of a conventional automatic transmission, which eliminates most of the sensation that the transmission is slipping.
A prominent example is the 2015 Nissan Altima SV sedan tested for this review. Under moderate acceleration its CVT shifts smoothly, without hiccups. But if you jam on the throttle, the engine rpms spool up to 4,000 or 4,500 rpms and then the transmission upshifts in a blink and drops the revs, just as would happen in a standard automatic.
There's also a quick kick-down passing mode if you press the accelerator pedal to overtake another car or merge onto a freeway. The CVT instantly jumps the engine to higher rpms for the needed power.

2015 Nissan Altima shifting gears - Houston Chronicle


According to Autoblog, Nissan is responding to poor initial quality survey scores on its transmissions, by reprogramming the CVTs across its lineup to simulate the feel of a traditional automatic transmission that holds on to a gear and then shifts.

Nissan is going to make their CVTs "shift" now


NASHVILLE -- A software change that makes a continuously variable transmission sound and feel less like a CVT will go into every CVT-equipped Nissan model.
D-Step creates the sensation that a CVT is shifting gears like a traditional automatic transmission though it is not.
The software change causes the transmission to jump ahead slightly in the gear ratios at around 4,000 rpms, depending on the vehicle's speed. The change creates a subtle momentary drop in driving force and the sense of a gear changing as on a traditional automatic transmission.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20140713/OEM03/307149936/nissan-tweaks-cvts-to-be-less-cvt-like
 

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If I'm only "partially correct", why did every article you referenced support what I said?
Because the part that you wrote that is incorrect, i.e. "Wrong", is when you said "There is something wrong with it." There is nothing wrong with it, this is how Nissan designed it.

So, for those keeping score at home, you had 1 incorrect answer, and 1 partially correct answer. I would not consider this as dumbing down the transmission. In reality, this version of the Nissan CVT is more advanced than the previous version.
 

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Because the part that you wrote that is incorrect, i.e. "Wrong", is when you said "There is something wrong with it." There is nothing wrong with it, this is how Nissan designed it.

So, for those keeping score at home, you had 1 incorrect answer, and 1 partially correct answer. I would not consider this as dumbing down the transmission. In reality, this version of the Nissan CVT is more advanced than the previous version.
You can't be serious. Here, I'll put it in Throck-speak for you:

IN MY OPINION, there is something wrong -- that is, the thought process is FLAWED -- with designing a system to work less efficiently than its intended design would otherwise dictate.

I think everyone here knew what I meant, including you.
 
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