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Discussion Starter #1
i was looking at my haynes manual, and it says you need to clean the caliper pins with high temp grease and also use anti-squeal compound on the back of both pads, is this necessary? im installing brembo rotors and metal master pads tomorrow, just want to make sure everything goes smooth. Also if anyone has any helpful hints i could use some. thanx
 

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i don't always regrease the caliper pins. especially if the little boot isn't split or popped off the little dimple. i do always use anti-squeal on pads though. i don't bother with shims either.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
also, the haynes manual is a little unclear. do you change the pads first then remove the rotor, or remove and replace the rotor first then install new pads? It also mentions that when using the c-clamp to push the piston into its bore , that the fluid in the master cylinder will rise and may overflow. that doesn't sound good.
 

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um, you have to remove the rotor first. that'll be kinda obvious once you get to it. as far as the master cylinder overflowing, i've never heard of that. i mean you're talking about a minimal amount of fluid being pushed back in. unless your fluid is way above the max line then you should be fine.
 

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1. break all 4 bolts on caliper loose.
2. remove bolt from one caliper pin and tilt caliper up.
3. press piston back into caliper using an old brake pad and a C clamp (or be an idjit and spend $20 on a tool that does the same thing and has no other uses). watch master cylinder reservoir as you're doing this to keep from overflowing it. the way the brake system is designed is that the master cylinder should be at MAX when you have full fluid and new brake pads. when the pads are about worn, the cylinder will be just about minimum. that's how much fluid is displaced. so if you've filled up your reservoir since the last time you changed pads, it's probably going to overflow. just use something to suck some of the fluid out and it's a non-issue. remove remaining brake pad as well and remember which was inner and outer (for the shims)

4. swing caliper back down and stick the bolt back in the caliper in to hold it in place.
5. remoce other two bolts holding the caliper on the knuckle.
6. remove caliper from knuckle. support caliper by hanging it from a strut or place it on a box or something so you don't stretch the rubber brake line.
7. remove rotor. use whatever means necessary. sometimes they come right off, sometimes it takes a 10lb sledge hammer.
8. clean wheel hub surface of all chunks and debris. make sure rear mounting surface of new rotor is clean as well.
9. replace rotor.
10. replace caliper. torque large bolts to spec.
11. remove lower caliper pin bolt and slide pin back up.
12. put shims on new pads and insert pads into caliper. lube back of pads with anti-squeal goop.
13. remove lower caliper pin- just pull it out.
14. wipe off old grease. inspect for rust and gouging. if it's got signs of either, replace the pin with a new one.
15. lube the pin with new lube. I just use wheel bearing grease, but nissan sells some special gunk for it. bah.
16. replace lower caliper pin.
17. rotate caliper down
18 put bolt back in lower caliper pin. torque to spec.
19. remove upper caliper pin bolt. remove upper caliper pin. clean, inspect, re-lube, reinstall, lower caliper, torque to spec.
20. check to make sure all bolts are torqued to spec and that both pads are installed.
21. get back in car and stomp on pedal a few times to seat pads and piston back against rotor (so you have brakes when you take the car off the jackstands.)

repeat for other side.

bleed brakes as necessary, check fluid for proper level when complete.
check brakes before hauling ass down the street and finding out you screwed something up when your pedal goes to the floor at the first stop sign.



If those instructions don't make sense to you, then please take the car to a competent shop, as I wouldn't trust it to be done properly.
 

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shims are not required for aftermarket pads. use lots of anti-squeal on the backs of the pads and make sure you apply it evenly and let it dry before youinstall the pads. the use of anti-sieze helps on the pins for the next time you need to do brake work
 

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they're not required, but they sure help with the noise. everyone has their opinions on it. for factory brakes, I use 'em. on my wilwoods, I made some out of some 18ga stainless steel sheet I had laying around. helped with the squealing when the goop didn't.
use as you wish.
 

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^^ yeah they are good aren't they? which wilwoods are u using? i'm seriously considering dynalites for my other car.. not much more than stock brembo replacement...

any good / bad experiences?
 

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I'm using the Dynalites on my car, but I'm going to be upgrading to the forged superlites sometime in the next few months. the dynalites stop the car fine, but pad life is a lot less than with the superlites. the original setup I designed was made to fit under some 16" wheels I had at the time, and the superlites wouldn't fit.

only problems I've had with them are some noises on street driving. I could care less about squeaks at the track, but on the street it's incredibly annoying.
 

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thanks for the heads up ! hrmm.. superlites eh.. :)
 

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Loose disc

When you replaced your pads, did you notice if your rotor was loose? My driver side rotor was almost coming off the lug nut studs when I remove the calipers and pads. Passenger side was fine.
 
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