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· Fibre Customs
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Keep getting my Battery Warning Light on. I have replaced my alternator 3 times thinking I got 2 bad ones. The battery is brand new. But I my Alternator is not charging 14V so my battery warning light keeps staying on. I read somewhere that the 03 Altima has a ECM controlled alternator that possibly had a faulty ECM. But I sent mine in to be repaired and they said the alternator is not ECM controlled and nothing was wrong with my ECM. After replacing the alternator for the 3rd time. I fixed the problem for 1 week of driving then the battery light came back on. So I have no idea what is the problem.. Anyone heard of this issue? Or have a opinion what you think is the problem. There are no blown fuses they are all good.
 

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Twin turbo, 3.5 inch exhaust, modified ECU, 6 inch mini tub, custom built roll cage, online tuner
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Keep getting my Battery Warning Light on. I have replaced my alternator 3 times thinking I got 2 bad ones. The battery is brand new. But I my Alternator is not charging 14V so my battery warning light keeps staying on. I read somewhere that the 03 Altima has a ECM controlled alternator that possibly had a faulty ECM. But I sent mine in to be repaired and they said the alternator is not ECM controlled and nothing was wrong with my ECM. After replacing the alternator for the 3rd time. I fixed the problem for 1 week of driving then the battery light came back on. So I have no idea what is the problem.. Anyone heard of this issue? Or have a opinion what you think is the problem. There are no blown fuses they are all good.
Wiring, loose connection. Check wiring on starter. Make sure it is tight. Check battery cables for corrosion inside the coating. Neg cable were it is bolted to ground. Fusable link. Does the car have an external regular for the alternator?
 

· Fibre Customs
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17,104 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've done all of that new battery cables. New fuse link gang that's mounted on the positive cable side the original one was good no blown fuses but replaced it anyways.. New fan belt tension is fine. Yes everything tight. New connector on alternator. Everything that has to do with the charging is new. Only thing that's not new is the wiring harness. What are the chances a wire inside the harness just all sudden go bad. Be ok for a week then decide to act up
 

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The generator belt vibrates obviously when idling, and the transmission belt is too loose and slips.Once the generator is confirmed to be faulty, it should be repaired immediately, and do not continue to let the generator "work with a disease". You can use the vin code to find the corresponding part, Nissan Alternator - Genuine OEM | NissanPartsDeal.com it's almost past black friday, maybe it can be cheaper, but, to be honest, I usually use this to find parts.Otherwise,I will buy parts and find my neighbor, he is the best auto repair master.Or you can check the dust-proof ring on the generator. It should be firm and should not be removed. It can prevent dust from entering the interior and cause mechanical failure.
 

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Twin turbo, 3.5 inch exhaust, modified ECU, 6 inch mini tub, custom built roll cage, online tuner
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I've done all of that new battery cables. New fuse link gang that's mounted on the positive cable side the original one was good no blown fuses but replaced it anyways.. New fan belt tension is fine. Yes everything tight. New connector on alternator. Everything that has to do with the charging is new. Only thing that's not new is the wiring harness. What are the chances a wire inside the harness just all sudden go bad. Be ok for a week then decide to act up
It is possible! I have done tons of repairs on wire harnesses at the back of fuse boxes, that is a hidden weak point to many wire harnesses. This issue is in the harness somewhere, you need to inspect the whole harness unplugging every plug and use an ohm meter as many places as you can. Plugs and fuse boxes do go bad! Harness repairs are the worst so I am sorry already!! But the issue can only be in the harness, you have eliminated the rest.
 

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Alts are NOT sealed per se, they have to take in air to cool the rotors and why the alts have cooling slots all over them. Dirt gets all in them and it can't be stopped.

If somebody is buying chain store alts they are typically junk, I used to sell them. Not unusual at all to have to have more than one in a year and what that lifetime warranty gets you. Junk. I failed 1 in every 5 right out of the boxes new.
 

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Alts are NOT sealed per se, they have to take in air to cool the rotors and why the alts have cooling slots all over them. Dirt gets all in them and it can't be stopped.

If somebody is buying chain store alts they are typically junk, I used to sell them. Not unusual at all to have to have more than one in a year and what that lifetime warranty gets you. Junk. I failed 1 in every 5 right out of the boxes new.
You're right about that! We used to rebuild them at a place I worked on forklifts we rebuild our own starters and alternators got pretty good at it. Seems to me like your voltage regulator keeps shorting out but I couldn't tell you why without actually trying to look at the vehicle. But you definitely have an issue that's shorting out something in the alternator I don't know if it's shorting out diodes and then it's burning out the regulator? Or if it's straight burning out the regulator? Sorry I can't be more help?? All I can tell you is you have a wiring issue, and I've had stuff like that and I ended up changing the whole harness to finally figure it out broken wire inside the harness middle way you'll never see it, you'll never find it, sucks! I had an issue I was dealing with with the Sentra the AC wasn't working correctly come to find out the plug from the wire harness to the AC was a crappy fit and it burns and shorts out. I think it was a 14 or 15. The worst part is Nissan knew all about it but they don't have any kind of service bulletins or knowledge or anything, they're not going to claim responsibility for it! Job kick my ass, took me 2 weeks to figure it out! Normally I'm better than that but couldn't see any damage unless you unplugged it and looked inside. Have you checked the fuse blocks and you checked all the wire harness plugs did you ohm any of the wires out for the alternator and charging system? Have you replaced any of them? I don't know brother?
 

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Keep getting my Battery Warning Light on. I have replaced my alternator 3 times thinking I got 2 bad ones. The battery is brand new. But I my Alternator is not charging 14V so my battery warning light keeps staying on. I read somewhere that the 03 Altima has a ECM controlled alternator that possibly had a faulty ECM. But I sent mine in to be repaired and they said the alternator is not ECM controlled and nothing was wrong with my ECM. After replacing the alternator for the 3rd time. I fixed the problem for 1 week of driving then the battery light came back on. So I have no idea what is the problem.. Anyone heard of this issue? Or have a opinion what you think is the problem. There are no blown fuses they are all good.
A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts. A battery should have a static charge of 12.3-12.8 volts when the engine is shut off. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge. If the bulb is OK but still does not illuminate, the circuit must be tested. If the warning lamp does illuminate, then the next thing to check is to make sure the circuit between the battery positive post, or fusible link, to the connection in back of the alternator is good. On Nissans, this will be a thick (approx. 10 gauge) wire to the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator. It's not uncommon for this wire to get corroded and burn up, creating resistance in the circuit. So, before assuming an alternator is bad, make sure this circuit is good and battery voltage is getting to the alternator. It's also important to make sure the alternator belt is tight and not slipping and the battery connections are clean and tight.

If your battery is draining after one or more days, then the battery may be no good; get the battery tested. If the battery is in good condition, then there may be a parasitic draw occurring in the electrical system. In this case a parasitic draw test needs to be performed; there should not be more than a 50ma (milliamp) draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range.

If you do these tests, make sure all accessories inside the car are shut off; this includes any courtesy lights such as the overhead lights. If the hood has an opening security sensor, it must be disabled. All the doors and trunk must be closed; if you need to have the driver's door open, put something against the door button to keep it pressed in order to break the electrical circuit. There should not be more than a 50ma draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. The reason being is the ECU and IPDM are always on in sleep mode which accounts for the very small draw. Parasitic draw testing can be complicated because when you pull a fuse for one device it can wake up another device; in particular it's true of fuses feeding the BCM so it's a matter of spending more time involved waiting for a device to hibernate. Remove the fuses one-by-one until the draw is eliminated; this will help you isolate the circuit that the draw is on. Leave the fuses out otherwise you may wake up some device.

When replacing electrical components such as alternators, starters and distributors, fuel injectors and sensors, always replace with new or reman'd Nissan OEM components; aftermarket components generally don't last long, don't work right and many times are DOA.
 

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A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts. A battery should have a static charge of 12.3-12.8 volts when the engine is shut off. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge. If the bulb is OK but still does not illuminate, the circuit must be tested. If the warning lamp does illuminate, then the next thing to check is to make sure the circuit between the battery positive post, or fusible link, to the connection in back of the alternator is good. On Nissans, this will be a thick (approx. 10 gauge) wire to the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator. It's not uncommon for this wire to get corroded and burn up, creating resistance in the circuit. So, before assuming an alternator is bad, make sure this circuit is good and battery voltage is getting to the alternator. It's also important to make sure the alternator belt is tight and not slipping and the battery connections are clean and tight.

If your battery is draining after one or more days, then the battery may be no good; get the battery tested. If the battery is in good condition, then there may be a parasitic draw occurring in the electrical system. In this case a parasitic draw test needs to be performed; there should not be more than a 50ma (milliamp) draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range.

If you do these tests, make sure all accessories inside the car are shut off; this includes any courtesy lights such as the overhead lights. If the hood has an opening security sensor, it must be disabled. All the doors and trunk must be closed; if you need to have the driver's door open, put something against the door button to keep it pressed in order to break the electrical circuit. There should not be more than a 50ma draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. The reason being is the ECU and IPDM are always on in sleep mode which accounts for the very small draw. Parasitic draw testing can be complicated because when you pull a fuse for one device it can wake up another device; in particular it's true of fuses feeding the BCM so it's a matter of spending more time involved waiting for a device to hibernate. Remove the fuses one-by-one until the draw is eliminated; this will help you isolate the circuit that the draw is on. Leave the fuses out otherwise you may wake up some device.

When replacing electrical components such as alternators, starters and distributors, fuel injectors and sensors, always replace with new or reman'd Nissan OEM components; aftermarket components generally don't last long, don't work right and many times are DOA.
I think you should read the posts before you post, just saying. He starts the first post how he keeps getting a charging light right off thw bat? You start your post about that light being burnt out? Not trying to be rude but you should have the courtesy to read his post so you know what help to offer him. I believe after reading everything he wrote that he is not clueless about a battery or a Charging system.
 

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I think you should read the posts before you post, just saying. He starts the first post how he keeps getting a charging light right off thw bat? You start your post about that light being burnt out? Not trying to be rude but you should have the courtesy to read his post so you know what help to offer him. I believe after reading everything he wrote that he is not clueless about a battery or a Charging system.
I have read the OP's thread from the start and all the replies. The procedures that I've posted are very similar to what the FSM describes. It may be rudimentary but it establishes a good starting point in the diagnosis. The obvious is many times overlooked.

Our forums are to try to help people with their vehicle problems. When trying to help people, sometimes a member's opinion is correct and sometimes it's not but that's OK; someone else will chime in and add their opinion.

It appears from the OP's description that there may be two problems:
  • - The charging system is not charging the battery. Many aftermarket alternators generally are not reliable, don't last long, and many times are DOA. When replacing electronic components, always use Nissan new or reman'd OEM components from a Nissan dealer or auto parts store.
  • - There may be a parasitic draw occurring in the electrical system.
 

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I have read the OP's thread from the start and all the replies. The procedures that I've posted are very similar to what the FSM describes. It may be rudimentary but it establishes a good starting point in the diagnosis. The obvious is many times overlooked.

Our forums are to try to help people with their vehicle problems. When trying to help people, sometimes a member's opinion is correct and sometimes it's not but that's OK; someone else will chime in and add their opinion.

It appears from the OP's description that there may be two problems:
  • - The charging system is not charging the battery. Many aftermarket alternators generally are not reliable, don't last long, and many times are DOA. When replacing electronic components, always use Nissan new or reman'd OEM components from a Nissan dealer or auto parts store.
  • - There may be a parasitic draw occurring in the electrical system.
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