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Does it have any effects on how your system sounds? Something just sounded different with the system and today it is real cold outside. I checked the pre-sets and they are all where I have put them. Just curious.
 

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domm said:


yours doesn't? WTF is your problem!!

go see a doctor.

or call God's tech support line and tell him you have the
ID Ten T error (write it out ID10T)

Now that's was lame, but whatever floats ur boat. :rolleyes:

back to the original tread's topic. The cold weather might hender some use on the head unit, amps, just b/c it's cold. I haven't had any problems when it's cold here, but then again, I also have remote start too.
 

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97AltimaRaver said:
ive had my system in 0 degree weather and no changes, maybe your subs suck and the rubber surroud hardened?:confused: :confused: :confused:
lets just say BS, but anyways, up here in MTL we get alot colder then the states, and yes it does have an effect on the sound. First off, it will sound different due to the voice coils being 'too cold'. And second, cause you cant get power to the subs fast enough since the cold will severly hinder the flow of the electricity. However once your wires, amp and coils and slightly warmed up, you will actually play much louder due to the lower air density.

And as for the above quote, any kind of rubber will get cold and move slower, thus hurting the higher frequenecy sub bass notes. The woofer will not be able to move as fast.
 

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rlaing said:
cold will severly hinder the flow of the electricity. However once your wires, amp and coils and slightly warmed up, you will actually play much louder due to the lower air density.

And as for the above quote, any kind of rubber will get cold and move slower, thus hurting the higher frequenecy sub bass notes. The woofer will not be able to move as fast.
where did you hear this? :flipbird:

cold is good for electricity.. hence the fan/heatsink on your computer.. most superconductors need to be taken down to near absolute zero to get the best efficiency..

do you have an Ohm meter? Check a lightbulb.. First when it has been off, then after it gets hot (don't burn yourself :p)
 

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Jordan is absolutly right, cold is better for the amps. I doubt that you will notice much difference in flow through a power or speaker wire due to cold, but i have noticed that my CD player likes to skip a lot more in the cold.



BTW i really don't believe that Montreal has an average temperature in the winter colder than Fargo.:)
 

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TL said:


where did you hear this? :flipbird:

cold is good for electricity.. hence the fan/heatsink on your computer.. most superconductors need to be taken down to near absolute zero to get the best efficiency..

do you have an Ohm meter? Check a lightbulb.. First when it has been off, then after it gets hot (don't burn yourself :p)
Uh.... I used to study this stuff. At freezing temperatures electricity will flow slower. Here is an example, ever noticed when it is really cold, how an LCD screen will refresh itself much slower, then when it is at a stable room temperature? It's because power isn't flowing fast enough. I don't know how to explain it in a technical term, since I haven't taken a course in that shit for about 5 yrs, but I studied in Digital Systems technology. Which was hardware programming. Most of my classes were on current, voltage and electricity flow.

*** EDIT ***

Wait a sec. look what I found...
http://www.antares.co.uk/temperature_compensation.htm
 

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resistivity of a Material increases as tempearture increases and decreases as temperature decreases, and when the resistivity of copper (such as in a wire) increases the current is impeded. Here is the equation.

P-Po=Po*(alpha)* (T-To)

where
P=resistivity
Po is resistivity at a given temperature
T= temperature
To= temperature that Po is given at
alpha is the temperature coefficient of resistivity constant
 
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