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Anybody else find the drivers seat uncomfortable. I am 6ft 2 in 230 lbs and cannot get comfortable. The worst part is the front edge (bolster) of the seat presses up into my leg and causes it to fall asleep. I find that I cannot adjust properly.
 

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You don't mention which trim level your car is. The amount of adjustability varies between the base/S level, the SV level and the SL level.

I have the SV and I find it comfortable, but it takes a bit of tweaking with the 6 way seats. It seems like I get less pressure on the back of my thigh by raising the seat a bit and moving it forward a bit. Then I adjust the recline until my head doesn't touch the head rest, then adjust the telescoping wheel to get the right reach.

You're taller than I am, so your results may vary.

I think the 8-way seats from the SL trim level probably make it easier to find the most comfortable position.
 

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You don't mention which trim level your car is. The amount of adjustability varies between the base/S level, the SV level and the SL level.

I have the SV and I find it comfortable, but it takes a bit of tweaking with the 6 way seats. It seems like I get less pressure on the back of my thigh by raising the seat a bit and moving it forward a bit. Then I adjust the recline until my head doesn't touch the head rest, then adjust the telescoping wheel to get the right reach.

You're taller than I am, so your results may vary.

I think the 8-way seats from the SL trim level probably make it easier to find the most comfortable position.
Good post. When I first bought my SV, like the OP I felt sore where the bolster meets the left thigh. The good news is that you will get used to this fast and it'll be comfortable. What I've had a very hard time getting used to were the head rests. I find them too far forward, especially since I like an upright sitting position. For the first 6 months of ownership I had the head rest turned around so it was comfortable. After I became comfortable in the seat, I recently turned the head rest around, reclined the seat more than I usually like, and have found myself getting used to it. I'm very glad that I can now have the head rest in its correct position for safety.

All in all, it does take quite a while to adjust and then get used to the seat, but over time you will find it satisfactory.
 

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SV with cloth seats here. I am not a big guy. I find the seats incredibly comfortable and the level of adjustability more than sufficient. Had no problems on an 8 hour road trip with only one stop at the halfway point.

Like the above two, I have the seat reclined a bit.
 

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I'm 6' 0" and a few pounds heavier then you, but I find seat to be one of the most comfortable seats I've ever had in any car. I too have the SV...
 

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If I had to change the seat design, I would increase the lower support, meaning more cushion from the lower part of the seat so my back could feel more of it. Some trims DO NOT come with lumbar support. I do agree there is so much hype about the NASA inspired seating on the new Altima, but I have driven other cars that have better front seats for the drivers.
 

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I'm super-frustrated right now. I got a 2013 Hyundai Sonata last June, and after 2-3 months, my neck and shoulders would get very tight and knotted when driving it. I was fine in our other two cars, and my old Maxima which I sold a few weeks after buying the Sonata.

So, I traded in my Sonata for a 2013 Altima 3.5 SL. During test drives, I found the seats and ergonomics much better. But, literally on the way home from the final purchase, my neck starts tightening up again. It's not as bad as the Sonata, but after owning this for almost half a year, there's still something with the seat that my neck and shoulders don't like. I've tried every permutation of the eight-way seat adjustments, tons of pillows, cushions, different neck stretches, etc, all to no avail. I'm still okay in my other vehicle, and my wife's new car as well. Maybe there's a psychological element to this as well...

So, I'm going through physical therapy to see if I can work out my neck issues. I am 6'5" and definitely don't have the best posture in the world....maybe the "zero-gravity" seats are forcing me into some posture that I just don't like.

:angry2:
 

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I find that the headrest is too forward so I can't put my back completely flat on the seat and the plastic door is too hard to lean my leg on.
 

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I'm super-frustrated right now. I got a 2013 Hyundai Sonata last June, and after 2-3 months, my neck and shoulders would get very tight and knotted when driving it. I was fine in our other two cars, and my old Maxima which I sold a few weeks after buying the Sonata.

So, I traded in my Sonata for a 2013 Altima 3.5 SL. During test drives, I found the seats and ergonomics much better. But, literally on the way home from the final purchase, my neck starts tightening up again. It's not as bad as the Sonata, but after owning this for almost half a year, there's still something with the seat that my neck and shoulders don't like. I've tried every permutation of the eight-way seat adjustments, tons of pillows, cushions, different neck stretches, etc, all to no avail. I'm still okay in my other vehicle, and my wife's new car as well. Maybe there's a psychological element to this as well...

So, I'm going through physical therapy to see if I can work out my neck issues. I am 6'5" and definitely don't have the best posture in the world....maybe the "zero-gravity" seats are forcing me into some posture that I just don't like.

:angry2:
Steve,

Try taking out the head rest and reinstalling it backwards. Drive like that for a week and see if it makes a difference. For the first 6 months of ownership I had to do that because I got neck pain and actually started to feel dizzy and nauseous after about ten minutes of driving.
 

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It's stupid how Nissan would promote their seats with oh "NASA's zero gravity inspiration". Bitch please, I'm not taking my car to space. Make it comfortable. Get inspired by Lazy Boy furniture or something.
 

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I find that the headrest is too forward so I can't put my back completely flat on the seat and the plastic door is too hard to lean my leg on.
If the headrests jutting to far forward are the main problem, then:

Turning around the headrest is not such a good solution in the Altima. It places the surface of the headrest so far behind your head that you could suffer a bad neck injury in an accident.

A better solution is to bend the headrest posts slightly to straighten the headrests up. You could try to do this yourself, but I'd suggest taking the car to an automobile upholstery shop (find someone who seems confident that they know what to do, and says they've done it before). I did this. They took the leather off the front headrests (so as not to scuff it) and bent the posts ever so slightly (don't bend them a lot. It doesn't take much to straighten up the headrests). They then let me sit in the car to try it, and adjusted them a bit more to my liking. Then they put the leather back on. The posts are bent very slightly with a shallow arc. They still slide up and down in the seatback, although they are harder to raise/lower than before (I don't care, since once they are set when do you ever adjust them anyway?). You don't see anything bent if you look at them. They look normal. Also, the posts are perfectly strong and solid.

The headrests are perfect for me now. I was beside myself when I first got the car as the headrests were cranking my head forward at a terrible downward angle and I could not get comfortable. I had to recline the seatback so far that I felt unsafe driving it. Now the seat fits me well. The headrest surface is about 1/2 inch behind my head now (very safe), as opposed to it wanting to be 1 inch in front of the back of my head before adjustment. It cost me $50 total for both front headrests.

Incidentally, a lot of cars are coming with the forward jutting headrests now (although the 2013 Altima seems particularly offensive, not to mention the headrests being rock hard). New U.S. regulations went into affect in (I think) 2009 that require new car designs to have headrests no more than 55 mm (~2 inches) behind the head of the "Average" driver. I guess my body doesn't fit the average driver type, whatever that is. Also, some manufacturers (e.g., Nissan?) are taking this a bit too far. They want that 5 star crash rating and the crash-test dummies show less damage if the headrests are jammed up against the back of the heads. But they aren't thinking that the crash-test dummies don't actually have to drive the cars. They only sit in them. Having a real driver with a cranked neck is not very safe in my opinion.
 

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Steve,

Try taking out the head rest and reinstalling it backwards. Drive like that for a week and see if it makes a difference. For the first 6 months of ownership I had to do that because I got neck pain and actually started to feel dizzy and nauseous after about ten minutes of driving.
I actually don't even rest my head on the headrest in its normal position. I have a head-forward posture, which is one thing my PT guy is helping me work on.
 

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Anybody else find the drivers seat uncomfortable. I am 6ft 2 in 230 lbs and cannot get comfortable. The worst part is the front edge (bolster) of the seat presses up into my leg and causes it to fall asleep. I find that I cannot adjust properly.
Drop the height of the bottom cushion which will reduce the pressure on your thighs.
 

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If the headrests jutting to far forward are the main problem, then:

Turning around the headrest is not such a good solution in the Altima. It places the surface of the headrest so far behind your head that you could suffer a bad neck injury in an accident.

A better solution is to bend the headrest posts slightly to straighten the headrests up. You could try to do this yourself, but I'd suggest taking the car to an automobile upholstery shop (find someone who seems confident that they know what to do, and says they've done it before). I did this. They took the leather off the front headrests (so as not to scuff it) and bent the posts ever so slightly (don't bend them a lot. It doesn't take much to straighten up the headrests). They then let me sit in the car to try it, and adjusted them a bit more to my liking. Then they put the leather back on. The posts are bent very slightly with a shallow arc. They still slide up and down in the seatback, although they are harder to raise/lower than before (I don't care, since once they are set when do you ever adjust them anyway?). You don't see anything bent if you look at them. They look normal. Also, the posts are perfectly strong and solid.

The headrests are perfect for me now. I was beside myself when I first got the car as the headrests were cranking my head forward at a terrible downward angle and I could not get comfortable. I had to recline the seatback so far that I felt unsafe driving it. Now the seat fits me well. The headrest surface is about 1/2 inch behind my head now (very safe), as opposed to it wanting to be 1 inch in front of the back of my head before adjustment. It cost me $50 total for both front headrests.

Incidentally, a lot of cars are coming with the forward jutting headrests now (although the 2013 Altima seems particularly offensive, not to mention the headrests being rock hard). New U.S. regulations went into affect in (I think) 2009 that require new car designs to have headrests no more than 55 mm (~2 inches) behind the head of the "Average" driver. I guess my body doesn't fit the average driver type, whatever that is. Also, some manufacturers (e.g., Nissan?) are taking this a bit too far. They want that 5 star crash rating and the crash-test dummies show less damage if the headrests are jammed up against the back of the heads. But they aren't thinking that the crash-test dummies don't actually have to drive the cars. They only sit in them. Having a real driver with a cranked neck is not very safe in my opinion.
Good post. I have heard of people doing what you did to the posts on other cars with offensive head rests. Here's my concerns: First off, by bending the posts they automatically become less rigid. If you were to get rear-ended, the head rest will have less ability to stay in place when your head hits it (the posts may bend further), thereby reducing its effectiveness. The second issue is when you sell the car you would have to disclose the modification, especially since the head rest is considered safety equipment.

I do agree that it is far better to do what you did rather than have discomfort and almost guarantee yourself a neck issue.
 

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Good post. I have heard of people doing what you did to the posts on other cars with offensive head rests. Here's my concerns: First off, by bending the posts they automatically become less rigid. If you were to get rear-ended, the head rest will have less ability to stay in place when your head hits it (the posts may bend further), thereby reducing its effectiveness. The second issue is when you sell the car you would have to disclose the modification, especially since the head rest is considered safety equipment.

I do agree that it is far better to do what you did rather than have discomfort and almost guarantee yourself a neck issue.
Hi LMK5,

I knew I would get called out on this by someone! You have a couple of decent points. I will say on the headrest being weaker after bending the posts, that is debatable and depends on how you define "Weaker". Cold working metal makes it more brittle (meaning it will strain less before it breaks), but the actual stress at the breaking point could actually be larger. That is what cold working does (and we're not talking about bending the metal back and forth enough times to where metal fatigue becomes an issue). In this case, the posts are actually hollow. If you distort the cross-section from round, then absolutely the posts will break under less stress. The extreme case of distortion is you kink the posts, and they'd be absolutely useless. That's why you need to be careful when you bend them. You don't bend them very much at all, and you want to distribute the bend along the shaft (don't just bend in one spot). I will say that my headrests seem just as strong now as before. I think if my head impacted it enough to break/bend it, I'd have a pretty major concussion if not a cracked skull!

On the disclosure when selling, I cannot argue against the legal aspects of this one. If someone is really worried, they can always bend just the drivers headrest, and purchase a new replacement headrest from Nissan before selling the car. The headrest cannot cost that much. I know for me, I am so much safer now (to both myself and everyone else on the road) by having my seatback more upright and having good control of the car and good visibility, rather than before where I was so far reclined that I myself felt unsafe driving the car.
 

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Hi LMK5,

I knew I would get called out on this by someone! You have a couple of decent points. I will say on the headrest being weaker after bending the posts, that is debatable and depends on how you define "Weaker". Cold working metal makes it more brittle (meaning it will strain less before it breaks), but the actual stress at the breaking point could actually be larger. That is what cold working does (and we're not talking about bending the metal back and forth enough times to where metal fatigue becomes an issue). In this case, the posts are actually hollow. If you distort the cross-section from round, then absolutely the posts will break under less stress. The extreme case of distortion is you kink the posts, and they'd be absolutely useless. That's why you need to be careful when you bend them. You don't bend them very much at all, and you want to distribute the bend along the shaft (don't just bend in one spot). I will say that my headrests seem just as strong now as before. I think if my head impacted it enough to break/bend it, I'd have a pretty major concussion if not a cracked skull!

On the disclosure when selling, I cannot argue against the legal aspects of this one. If someone is really worried, they can always bend just the drivers headrest, and purchase a new replacement headrest from Nissan before selling the car. The headrest cannot cost that much. I know for me, I am so much safer now (to both myself and everyone else on the road) by having my seatback more upright and having good control of the car and good visibility, rather than before where I was so far reclined that I myself felt unsafe driving the car.
Well it sounds like you know a lot more about metals than I do. I'm glad it would still be safe because I wouldn't mind having it done on my head rest. In fact I asked a couple of auto interior places if they'd do it and they didn't want to mess with it. My father-in-law is a mechanical wizard so I'm sure he could do it.

I agree that it makes sense to have it done if it gets you in the correct sitting position for comfort and safety. Being uncomfortable in a new car really is irritating.
 

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I've noticed all the cars I test drove have this same issue. It's safer in an accident to have that support, and that's why I think so many manufactures are doing it. They are more concerned with lawsuits then they are about comfort. It's also a reason why many shops will hesitate to alter them, specially if it might weaken the posts. If you do it your self there is no legal issue, but when you pay a company to do it, they are at risk of a later lawsuit. We live in a lawsuit happy society, that's why everything has those stupid warnings on them, its really gotten ridiculous! Other countries make fun of us.
 

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Anybody else find the drivers seat uncomfortable. I am 6ft 2 in 230 lbs and cannot get comfortable. The worst part is the front edge (bolster) of the seat presses up into my leg and causes it to fall asleep. I find that I cannot adjust properly.
Yeah- I have the same build as you, and you nailed my only complaint about the seat-- but it is a small complaint for me--more like an annoyance. The front edge of the seat pushes up into the middle of my right thigh.

My 2.5SL has the 8-way seats. My wife RAISES the seat higher, and tilts the front edge higher. When I get in, I lower it almost all the way, BUT, the level of adjustment for that front edge just isn't quite there. If I could just tilt that front edge down just a tiny bit more, I'd be in seat heaven. :woot2:
 

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Every time I get my seat set just right someone will get in and move it.
Wife, Dealership (oil change), friend setting in the new car, Tint shop, etc...
Constant Battle!
 

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Every time I get my seat set just right someone will get in and move it.
Wife, Dealership (oil change), friend setting in the new car, Tint shop, etc...
Constant Battle!
Drives me nuts that these SL's don't have memory seats. That one option I really miss from my last car.
 
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