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Hi - so I have a 2005 Maxima and I'm had just about enough with it... Its a great little car and I love it, but all the sudden its throwing codes left and right and sometimes going into limp mode. All of the codes its given me have to do with sensors, and when I replace them, all the codes are gone and it works perfectly! For a few days... Then it just goes back to having its weird issues. I just replaced the alternator, bank 1 and 2 camshaft position sensors, my crankshaft position sensor, one of my downstream o2 sensors, and also a caliper. The codes its throwing now are for the bank 1 camshaft position sensor (brand new) and the three way catalyst. I just got this car 3 months ago and it was great, but now I can barely drive it into town and back. The main problems its been having are weird shifting/jerking into gear and shifting late (around 4,000-4,500 rpms). Could it be a bad ECM? Bad transmission? Please help me figure this out!
 

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Have you tried sea foam treatment? Replaced the MAF sensor? Those cars drove like a brick when the MAF sensor takes a dump. Let me know if this helps.
 

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Have you tried sea foam treatment? Replaced the MAF sensor? Those cars drove like a brick when the MAF sensor takes a dump. Let me know if this helps.
I have not tried the sea foam treatment, I’ll have to look into it. I checked the MAF sensor and it looks alright but I’ll take it out and clean it today and see if it works!
 

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... I just replaced ..., bank 1 and 2 camshaft position sensors, my crankshaft position sensor, one of my downstream o2 sensors, ...
When you said you replaced the sensors which brand did you replace with? I had my crank and 1 cam sensor go bad and replaced them with Duralast sensors from AutoZone but I hear that they're not the best ones to use. I hear people have a lot of problems with sensors that aren't OEM.

Also, 1) what exactly are the codes that your car is throwing and 2) have you pulled codes with a high-end scanner that will pull non-generic/extended/manufacturer codes?

There's a possibility that you're having communication issues that aren't showing up in the 'normal' codes that cheap scanner have access to.
 

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Hello; I may be suggesting things you have already checked. I guess from you posts you have some reason to replace sensors. Are you getting codes from a scanner? If so it is worth thinking the codes do not necessarily always mean the sensor itself is bad. Could be a poor connection, a bad ground, corroded wires especially around the battery.
It is my understanding a computer is looking for voltages or resistance from the wires which feed into it.
Might be worth having a look at the physical condition of the wires, connectors, terminals and vacuum hoses. Vacuum hoses because a bad hose can affect the readings some sensors send or receive.
 

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Hi - so I have a 2005 Maxima and I'm had just about enough with it... Its a great little car and I love it, but all the sudden its throwing codes left and right and sometimes going into limp mode. All of the codes its given me have to do with sensors, and when I replace them, all the codes are gone and it works perfectly! For a few days... Then it just goes back to having its weird issues. I just replaced the alternator, bank 1 and 2 camshaft position sensors, my crankshaft position sensor, one of my downstream o2 sensors, and also a caliper. The codes its throwing now are for the bank 1 camshaft position sensor (brand new) and the three way catalyst. I just got this car 3 months ago and it was great, but now I can barely drive it into town and back. The main problems its been having are weird shifting/jerking into gear and shifting late (around 4,000-4,500 rpms). Could it be a bad ECM? Bad transmission? Please help me figure this out!
When a charging system is not charging, or overcharging, a lot of "strange" things can occur. It's not uncommon to see a multiple of stored trouble codes in the ECM memory. So, whenever a car is setting a multiple of trouble codes, idling funny or stalling, or anything out of the "norm," test the charging system before you start pulling hairs!

A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts, but this is a general spec, and the factory service manual should be referenced for the correct charging system voltage specifications for a particular vehicle. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge.

Inspect the engine ground points to make sure they are tight and no oxidation on the connections.

As a side note: When replacing electrical components such as alternators, starters and distributors, fuel injectors and sensors, always replace with new or reman'd Nissan OEM components; aftermarket components generally don't last long, don't work right and many times are DOA.
 

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What is/are the code(s) you're currently getting? I haven't owned a Nissan long but have used aftermarket sensors on other makes without ever a problem.
 

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Hello; your 2016 Versa should have a small port somewhere under the dashboard. These ports are standard for most all cars I think. You can get an inexpensive scanner tool which plugs into the port. That scanner tool will "talk" to the car's computer and will "read" any trouble codes the computer may have stored.
Once you have the codes, then you will have clues about what the problems may be. I say clues because the codes are only hints about the sections of the engine controls that are not showing "normal" readings.
You could get a code for a sensor such as an (O2) oxygen sensor. Might not be the O2 sensor is bad but a harness or some other connection problem. Maybe a vacuum line is old or split. Maybe a wire is lose or poorly connected.

I do not have one, but have seen scan tools which send the information to a smart phone.
 

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When you said you replaced the sensors which brand did you replace with? I had my crank and 1 cam sensor go bad and replaced them with Duralast sensors from AutoZone but I hear that they're not the best ones to use. I hear people have a lot of problems with sensors that aren't OEM.

Also, 1) what exactly are the codes that your car is throwing and 2) have you pulled codes with a high-end scanner that will pull non-generic/extended/manufacturer codes?

There's a possibility that you're having communication issues that aren't showing up in the 'normal' codes that cheap scanner have access to.
Right now I’m getting a P0420 (catalyst system) and P0340 (bank 1 camshaft). The other day it got stuck in 5th gear and would shift out even with the slap stick, but it hasn’t done it since then. Right now I’m barely driving it though. I used a pretty good OBD2 scanner, not a snap on though.
It does have broken flex pipes and my boyfriend had to straight pipe it cause I hit a rather large rock and broke my resonator.
 

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What is/are the code(s) you're currently getting? I haven't owned a Nissan long but have used aftermarket sensors on other makes without ever a problem.
P0420 (three way catalyst system) and P0340 (bank 1 cps failure/circuit)

I ordered all my part from RockAuto
 

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When a charging system is not charging, or overcharging, a lot of "strange" things can occur. It's not uncommon to see a multiple of stored trouble codes in the ECM memory. So, whenever a car is setting a multiple of trouble codes, idling funny or stalling, or anything out of the "norm," test the charging system before you start pulling hairs!

A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts, but this is a general spec, and the factory service manual should be referenced for the correct charging system voltage specifications for a particular vehicle. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge.

Inspect the engine ground points to make sure they are tight and no oxidation on the connections.

As a side note: When replacing electrical components such as alternators, starters and distributors, fuel injectors and sensors, always replace with new or reman'd Nissan OEM components; aftermarket components generally don't last long, don't work right and many times are DOA.
I believe all the parts are OEM parts, I’ll have to check. But how do I test the charging system?
 

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PO420 is a catalyst inefficiency code and often points to a bad catalytic converter. Here's a link for what to check for the PO340. P0340 Nissan - Camshaft Position Sensor Circuit Bank 1 If the camshaft positions sensor is bad it effects the firing of the fuel injectors and could be putting in excessive fuel causing a problem with the catalytic converter. Any auto parts store should be able to test the charging/electrical system and tell you if there's a problem or not. As for parts coming from Rock Auto that's where I buy a lot of my parts and never have an issue with their parts.
 

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It does have broken flex pipes and my boyfriend had to straight pipe it cause I hit a rather large rock and broke my resonato
PO420 is a catalyst inefficiency code and often points to a bad catalytic converter.
Hello; A guess is the damage to the flex pipe is part of the cause of your issues. I am guessing "flex pipe" is the short braided exhaust section between the engine and the solid exhaust pipes. Could be the wires or the connector to the oxygen sensor are damaged in some way. Maybe a lose or frayed wire. Maybe the connector is not plugged in all the way. Same for the camshaft sensor. Check the wires and connector.
Not sure of the setup on the Versa but most cars have at least two oxygen sensors (O2). One before the catalytic converter and a second one after the converter. Could be the second O2 sensor is bad or not properly connected so is sending a code.

However if by "straight pipe" it means the boyfriend removed the catalytic converter altogether and put a straight pipe back in it's place, this is another much bigger problem. In the early days of converters this could be done but not anymore is my understanding. The computer needs to get the right signals from the O2 sensors. If the O2 sensors them selves are good, then the computer may figure the converter is bad and has sent the code. I hope this is not the case for the sake of your pocket book. Converters can be costly.

Good luck
 

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A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts, but this is a general spec, and the factory service manual should be referenced for the correct charging system voltage specifications for a particular vehicle. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge.
Hello; All you need to do a basic check of the battery and also the alternator is a volt ohm meter. Even a cheap one will do. I have found them for under $10 at times. Be sure to set the dial on battery voltage. With the engine off touch the red lead to the positive battery terminal and the black lead to the negative battery terminal. A good battery will have over 12 volts as rogman stated.
If the engine will start just do the same procedure. Red to positive and black to negative battery post. Over 13 volts for sure. I like to see 14 volts or so.

To do a deep battery check another devicee will be needed. No sense in buying one yourself. Go to Autozone, Advance or one of the other parts places. Or go to a battery place. They can do a load test on the battery to see if it's core structure is sound.
 

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Right now I’m getting a P0420 (catalyst system) and P0340 (bank 1 camshaft). The other day it got stuck in 5th gear and would shift out even with the slap stick, but it hasn’t done it since then. Right now I’m barely driving it though. I used a pretty good OBD2 scanner, not a snap on though.
It does have broken flex pipes and my boyfriend had to straight pipe it cause I hit a rather large rock and broke my resonator.
Here's what I found online for those codes:
P0340 NISSAN Possible Causes
  • Faulty Camshaft Position Sensor
  • Camshaft Position Sensor harness is open or shorted
  • Camshaft Position Sensor circuit poor electrical connection
  • Faulty starter motor
  • Starting system circuit
  • Dead (Weak) battery

P0420 NISSAN Possible Causes
  • Faulty Three-way Catalyst Converter Bank 1
  • Exhaust Tube
  • Intake Air Leaks
  • Faulty Oxygen (O2) Sensor
  • Faulty Fuel injector(s)
  • Leaking Fuel Injector (s)
  • Faulty Spark plugs
  • Improper Ignition Timing
  • Faulty Engine Control Module (ECM)
  • Dirty Air Filter
You should look into how to test any sensor before simply replacing it. As you're aware by now, just replacing sensors that are probably the cause can be expensive. Each of those sensors is around $100 and then if you're having them installed (versus doing it yourself) things add up super quick. I would google how to test any suspect sensors and then just start checking things off. Start with simple/cheap things first. I would also start trying to fix the P0340 code first as it may cause the P0420 code (but almost impossible for the P0420 to cause the P0340).

I would start by checking the grounding strap. Then with taking your car to AutoZone, a mechanic, or buying an Amazon battery tester (~$45) to check the overall charging/starting system. If neither of those steps work for you, then investigate of the CPK sensor itself is bad then check the harness. After P0340 gets fixed, reset the codes and see if the P0420 comes back.

Fixing the P0420 should be done in much the same way: easy/simple stuff first, then cheapest/most likely, then expensive/difficult/least likely. Before you replace, verify it's actually broken. You don't want to replace a sensor when the problem is a harness or ground strap.
 
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