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www.carzonemotorsport.com
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Discussion Starter #1
I am currently looking for some cheap and good calipers. The ones I currenlty have seem to be losing pressure when applied and no one seems to know why. I have looked in a couple of junk yards around town, but here in my area not many junk yards have Altimas....
Any help will do....
Thanks
 

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missing El Polo Loco...
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2,165 Posts
i think i better post the write up here. just so it may be used by others whom interested in the DIY project as well.

Front:
1. So you got the caliper off the car. Now grab a pump (a bicycle pump is fine), and pump air into the brake line entry point at the caliper, remember to put a piece of wooden block between the piston and the caliper's body. The piston should pop out easily.

2. First, grab the dust boot and remove it from the caliper. Next you grab the piston and pull it straight out carefully. Once the piston is out, grab a pencil or toothpick, there is 1 rubber O ring on the cylinder's wall/inside the bore. Pick the seal out.

3. Prepare the new bore seal by coating it with brake fluid. Now put it inside the bore, making sure it's flat against the bore. That's easy. Now come the bitchy part..

4. Since there's no clip securing the dust boot to either the bore nor the piston, things get pretty interesting. the dust boot only got secured to the piston by its lip tension. Don't forget to coat it in brake fluid as well. Now, carefully, not to scratch the piston, try to massage the piston, together with the dust boot back to their original possition. This process alone can take up to 1hr per side if you're a beginer. Once the piston is in the bore, check if the dust boot is also secured to the bore in a good manner. the hardest part is to push the piston back in straight, while keeping the dust boot secured. The trick I used is to fully extend the dust boot's skirt while it's on the piston, and then slowly work it into the caliper.

Rear:
1. Usually, the parking brake mechanism doesn't need to be replaced, so I'll just go on with the basic dustboot and bore seal replacement here to make things less complicated. Turn the piston counter clockwise to get it out of the bore. you can either use a needle nose pliers or a brake piston tool that basically looks like a cube with studs proturding from it. Once you get the piston out, follow the above procedures # 2-3.

4. When you're ready to install the piston, same trick as above, but make sure the dust boot's skirt is well coated in brake fluid, because as you turn the piston clockwise to get it in, the boot will tend to get out of its grove in the bore. Again, another 1 hr at least to get the assembly right if you're just begining, per side.

Rear wheel cylinder for drum brakes:
It's cheap enough to just replace with a new one if yours leaking.

The fine, bold print:
It is suggested that when you rebuild calipers in pairs (front pair, rear pair), in order to keep things balanced, and it's a good insurance too. If however, you opted to rebuild only one side, you're on your own. I'm not responsible.


Rebuild kits for front calipers only include new bore seal and new dustboot, plus some metal hardware to secure the dustboot to the cylinder bore on certain cars. As for the rear, it usually includes the previously mentioned, plus new parking brake adjuster/pusher mechanism.
 

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missing El Polo Loco...
Joined
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2,165 Posts
An add on I just remembered, actually, it's possible to do the rebuild on the car without disconnecting the brake line, but limited access/space to work on will double the time for sure (I did). Just loosen the bleeder when it's time to push the piston back in.

In any case, if you have to disconnect the brake line, replace the banjo fitting's cooper gaskets with new ones.

And remember to re-bleed the brake system after done rebuilding.
 
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