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Manual says 80...I think the ESM said 80-95...It did give a pretty broad range...I do not feel like looking it up now..going to bed.... I have all of mine at 80
 

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Thanks Willy!!!!

Thanks, Willy!!!

You are going to bed? It is a little too early for that. Besides I am watching the Miami/Pitt game.

Thanks!!!!:bigok:
 

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80 lbs/ft.


To g-cia35;

Nearly all nuts, spark plugs, bolts, and such on a car require torquing, though many people either don't know this, don't have the information available, or just don't bother with it.

Yes it can cause problems if you don't properly torque wheel lug nuts.. especially if you have disk brakes. Several things can happen. It is virtually impossible to properly and evenly tighten the lugs without a torque wrench. It some nuts are looser than others, they can work loose even more and can actually come off of their lug. The other problem is the danger of warping the rotors with unevenly, and especially over-tightened nuts.

When I took delivery of my car, I checked the torque on all four wheels and some of the nuts were incredibly loose. Not one wheel was uniform. A few of the nuts were close to being able to be removed by hand.
 

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Loose lugnuts must be a Nissan manufacturing trademark.
All of mine were way under torqued when I took delivery. :mad:
I suggest everyone check their lugnuts before you wish you had.
 

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Yes I could do a few of mine with my fingers....I guess that is how Nissan preps cars...All they do is wash them and put check marks in the boxes
 

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80 is what the manual says. So mine are 85.

list:
1. Check tire pressure on delivery.
2. Check oil level.
3. Check lug nuts.

Any other critical ones?
 

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To e-squared;

Good point about the oil level (and other fluids), and tire air pressure. I forgot to mention that one.

In some years past, dealers were notorious for underinflating tires to give the impression of a softer ride. With many of today's cars, this can work against them because buyers have certain expectations about performance cars and would probably notice this at some point. When I checked the air pressure in my tires after delivery, it was pretty much right on the money.


To wild willy;

Scary isn't it? American assembly lines have a hydraulically operated torquing machine which a worker uses to tighten all of the lugs nuts at one time. That way, they are uniform and correct. You have to wonder if or why Nissan doesn't do this.
 

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To g-cia35;

One more thing. If you plan to change your own oil, you should definitely use a torque wrench for the drain plug for two reasons.

Nissan uses a brass washer for the drainplug. This makes proper torque very important since the washer is designed to collapse. Use 26 lbs/feet on this item.

Also, the pan is stamped steel. Overtightening can cause the threads to strip on the drainplug.. a very bad thing.
 

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pvick said:
One more thing. If you plan to change your own oil, you should definitely use a torque wrench for the drain plug for two reasons.
This is exactly why I am using the Fram Sure-Drain that I really like. One tighten and then no more untighten and tighten cycles. Much easier.
 

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I don't know if you guys have Ace Hardware stores near you but that is where I bought mine a couple of years ago. It was like $45 or $50 and it is a really good torque wrench. The torque wrench that I have is one of the ones that you can preset to the correct torque. When you have tightened the nuts down to the correct torque it clicks and won't let you tighten it anymore. It is NOT one of the ones (visual display type) with the little piece of metal that points to what torque value the nut has been tightened to. Just FYI.

I was surprised that before I started this thread that there were not any threads that specifically called out the correct lugnut torque specification. I am even more glad that I started this thread since there were some members that did not realize the importance of correctly tightening nuts to the specified torque.

g

P.S.: I called the local Ace Hardwares (two of them) and neither of them carry them. The Ace Hardware that I bought mine from is now out of business.
 

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You can get one from Harbor freight rather cheap..Lets face it ..most of us do minimal work on our cars and an average TQ wrench will suffice.
 

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I picked mine up from Sears a few years ago. Half-inch, so I picked up some metric and standard deep-well sockets to go with it. Spent less than a hundred on the whole setup.
 

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Maybe I just over-do things but I've got 3 different torque wrenches.
One I use if torque isn't abosultely positively critical and there is a chance that I may drop the wrench because of where the bolt is. That way if I drop the wrench I haven't ruined a really nice torque wrench.
The other two are very nice torque wrenches that I treat like they're made of glass. I'm sure dropping one a few times isn't good for their calibration.
One is a 3/8 drive and is for smaller torque jobs and the other is a 1/2 inch drive for items over 85ft/lbs.

Like I said, maybe I just tend to be too anal when it comes to my cars. :confused:
 
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