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To the guy who wrote about asking why the fuel gauge tells you that you have less fuel than you actually do. Even when the gauge is actually registering dead on empty you actually have at least 50 miles left of fuel. But don't test it. the reason they did that was because they never want you to run out of fuel. If the engine ever does run out of fuel you will destroy the fuel pump plus risk detonation within the combustion chamber. Thus the Nissan execs erred on the side of caution. I remember the good old days when my mother ran out of gas back in the 50's we kids thought it was funny. In those days you just got a container of gas and poured it in and you were off to the fuel pump to fill up again . Times have changed.
 

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This an email I sent to one of the execs at Nissan head office in Canada. the funny thing is I still don't understand why the precat materiel gets sucked into the engine. The pressure goes from high(combustion chamber) to low (tailpipe) so unless the cats get completely blocked the engine should be safe. But what do I know ? I just drive these things. However wouldn't every engine be in danger of this scenario? There is no EGR system on the 2.5 Altima and that is weird cause Nissan were one of the 1st inventors of EGR.


Dear Sir,



I recently became the 3rd owner of a 2006 Altima that had only 68000 km on it. I have put another 5000 km on it in 4 months. Even though the car had never been rustproofed I figured with such low mileage on it I couldn't lose because I got a steal of a deal. However in 4 months I have had to put $6000 Canadian into it including new summer tires because the old OEM tires were worn down to dangerous levels and new rear shock absorbers, 2 rear stabilizer links, rear coil springs plus a muffler and new air filter and a new cabin filter. Basically the 3rd generation Altimas were a lemon. However with careful planning and good maintenance and some luck, I think I can get to my target of 300000 km. The previous owner never rustproofed it and that was a big mistake as these cars are known as Fred Flintstone cars. There was a design flaw with the floorboards rusting from the inside out that Nissan only corrected in 2007 when they redesigned the Altima for the 4th generation. That fact is the basis of a class action lawsuit in the state of Illinois on behalf of all 2002-2006 Altima owners in the state of Illinois. We will have to wait for the verdict and how it will apply to owners outside of the state of Illinois if the suit is successful. In the meantime I had to spend $900 to put new steel plates in the floor on both the front drivers side and passenger side. The other major problem with the 2002-2006 Altimas and some Sentras was the fact that the crankshaft position sensor was made with a cheap plastic housing that cracked under high heat and oil got into it and began giving faulty signals to the ECM. Nissan ignored the problem for 5 years until there were so many Altima and Sentra owners who were bringing their cars in under the warranty, that they finally redesigned the sensor in late 2006. My car was one of the last on the Smyrna, Tennessee assembly line but it seems that Nissan never replaced the faulty sensor on the factory floor until the 2007 model year and by then they had completely redesigned the Altima including a completely new sensor for the 4th generation Altimas. However in 2007 Nissan finally had to do something because they were faced with a 20 million dollar problem of replacing almost a million crankshaft position sensors on both models of cars. They came up with the idea of reprogramming the ECU so that the ECU basically ignores any signal that it gets from the faulty crankshaft position sensor. This was a lot cheaper than installing a new redesigned part in a million cars. Officially there were about 800000 cars on the official recall list but there are many horror stories of many early Altima and Sentra owners never getting a recall letter because their VIN number did not show up on the list. The early Sentras and Altimas both had the same QR25DE engine with a crankshaft position sensor measuring the crankshaft angle and engine rotation speed located in the engine block and a camshaft position sensor which is exactly the same part number as the crankshaft sensor but located in a different place near the camshaft. Nissan changed the factory service manual in late 2006 to reflect the fact that they had all the owners bring in their cars for reprogramming. The manual states " When the crankshaft position sensor (POS) system becomes inoperable, the camshaft position sensor (PHASE) provides various controls of engine parts instead, utilizing timing of cylinder identification signals." Seems like your lawyer wrote that clause. Some owners had wanted their sensors to be replaced by the new redesigned sensor instead but some dealers wanted to charge them $400 even though the cars were under warranty. When the dealer said that the car would be reprogrammed for free, 99.9 % of the owners opted for the reprogramming. The problem is that during the time that the faulty crankshaft position sensor was sending garbage to the ECU all hell was breaking loose inside the car with DTC (diagnostic trouble codes)constantly popping up and the owners bringing back their cars to see what was wrong. The recall went out twice once in August in the US and in November 2007 for Canada. So in the case of my car the previous owner had driven it for 14 months before he received the recall letter. Some other owners especially the early 2002 Altima and Sentra owners had been driving their car for 5 years with the problem. There is no way of knowing exactly when each crankshaft position sensor on any of the cars went wonky but any owner who drove their car fast and on long drives probably were in a worse position. To top this all off QR25DE are interference engines along with every other engine that Nissan makes. These engines give better gas mileage because the valves are allowed to invade the same space that the pistons occupy(at different times of course) so that the air flow is optimized for ultimate clean efficient engine combustion. However this necessitates making the tolerances so fine in engine design that the intake and exhaust manifolds are both open at the same time for a fraction of a second on each engine 360 degree revolution. This wouldn't be a problem if there was nothing to be sucked back into the engine. However since every car now has to have a catalytic converter( the Altima has 2 cats); if the honeycomb material breaks down inside the cat that is next to the exhaust manifold, it will get sucked back into the engine with eventual engine failure. The longer the period of time that the faulty crankshaft position sensor's information was being sent to the ECM the more likely that the cat would heat up too high having to deal with the incompletely burnt fuel from the engine cylinder. In that case fragments would get sucked back into the engine. The internet is full of stories where an Altima or Sentra owner would be driving without problems for up to 150000 km (some a lot less) and suddenly they get DTC (diagnostic trouble codes) and Service Engine Soon lights and they get the bad news from their mechanic that their engine is unrepairable. So knowing the above facts, I on a hunch on December 14, 2015 took my 2006 Altima into my local garage to check on the cats. The mechanic put the car on the hoist and pulled off the back cat and as he was doing so, pieces of the cat dropped out. This was not catastrophic because these pieces would never get past the 1st cat. However when he took off the undercover of the 1st cat that is bolted onto the exhaust manifold, we saw a burnt spot on the honeycomb larger than a quarter. The mechanic told me I might be lucky that nothing got sucked back into the engine. He said that if I had driven it much longer I would have risked engine damage. So my hunch was right. The Nissan dealer and their mechanics said that the cats should last forever on these PZEV(Partial Zero Emission vehicles) vehicles. Nissan however only gives a 8 year cat warranty Canada , even though in California the exact same car has a 15 year warranty mandated by the state of California. Canada does not have the 2 warranty laws(Federal Emissions Defect Warranty and the Federal Emissions Performance Warranty) that the US has. Cats normally should last a very long time but not when faulty crankshaft and or camshaft position sensors are sending garbage to the ECM. It cost me $2400 to replace the 2 cats plus 2 oxygen sensors, but I may have saved a potential engine cost of $8000 Can from a blown engine. I have heard that excessive idling causes cat failure but nothing about this in the owners manual nor have I read it anywhere. So there are 3 possible causes for my cat damage. The previous owner idling his car, the fact that sometime in the 14 months before the crankshaft position sensor was disabled through reprogramming, the sensor had started to go bad, or the 3rd scenario of the camshaft position sensor(the same actual part number as the cheap plastic housing crankshaft position sensor) was faulty for the last 9 years and little bit by little bit ruining the cat. On top of this the car had always growled too much on acceleration, but at no time has it ever produced any DTC since I got it. To prove the 3rd scenario on the 6th of January 2016 I went into my local Nissan dealer and purchased the redesigned crankshaft/camshaft position sensor and had it installed the next day. Don't forget for the last 8 years only the camshaft position sensor was sending engine rotation info back to the ECM because the crankshaft position sensor is ignored because of the reprogramming done to the ECM on December 14, 2007. After the camshaft position sensor was replaced with the correctly designed part number 23731- 6N21A, the car is no longer growling during acceleration. I can only conclude from this is that the 3rd scenario above is true and that Nissan should have replaced both of these sensors in 2007 when the recall went out. The remaining fact though is that there are hundreds of thousands of Nissan vehicles out there without a functioning crankshaft position sensor of reprogramming and a good many of them with a faulty camshaft position sensor which is the same part but just in a different place. However this may actually be a good thing. The way I see it now is that it is better not to have a functioning crankshaft position sensor in Altimas because if and when it ever goes bad, garbage information gets sent to the ECU but the car still runs. Eventually you will get the MIL light but the frustration of actually diagnosing the problem left many owners to just ignore it eventually to their peril. The malfunctioning crankshaft position sensor played havoc with the cars combustion which eventually led to overheated catalytic converters and in too many cases to engine failure. As long as the timing chain doesn't loosen and the camshaft position sensor does its job then the car doesn't actually need a crankshaft position sensor. You will start losing a little gas mileage as the timing chain ages and gets out of position slightly but you wont suffer engine damage because if the camshaft position sensor goes bad the car wont start or will simply shut down when you are driving. Until that happens the car will run fine without a crankshaft position sensor as long as the timing chain is good. So it actually seems as if we car owners are better off without a crankshaft position sensor. A little gas mileage gets lost as the timing chain ages but that is a whole lot better than damaged cats and maybe a damaged engine. The system of 2nd trip detection logic is wacky but all the manufacturers use it as part of the OBDII standard. The whole computerized system was set up to stop pollution NOT to detect possible engine damage to our cars. The manufacturers give you both the camshaft and crankshaft sensors (when just the camshaft sensor would do) cause they want to squeeze every last ounce of decreased fuel costs so that they can keep up their lowering fuel consumption fleet averages so as to be able to keep selling cars in the state of California who have threatened the car manufacturers if they don't eventually go to zero emissions. 90 % of the DTC codes are only set when the bad event happens for 2 successive car trips. There are only 21 bad diagnostic trouble codes that put the car into a fail safe condition on Altimas so that the MIL light must come on in those conditions. So you could be on a long trip for hundreds of miles before you stop for a rest and turn off the car. For the non fail safe trouble codes (DTC), the MIL light will only come on, on the 2nd trip. So most motorists think that the MIL (Service Engine Soon) light is their protector against serious damage to your car. NOT TRUE. In most cases it is there to stop bad emissions and it is only a side consequence in a few extreme cases that the car is protected by the warning light. In many cases it is too late. The damage has already been done.



So I'm thinking maybe I should get the timing chain, guides, and tensioner and sprockets replaced in another 50000 kilometres as a preventive measure. Nissan says that the timing chain will last the lifetime of the car but I have known Altima owners who have had to replace the timing change after 200000 km. Note that the timing chain is still working all the time you are idling so if you idle a lot it could be the same thing as doubling your mileage.



However that brings us back to my damaged cats. I am one year past the Canadian warranty date of 8 years on the cats. However my cats were damaged because of a faulty camshaft position sensor which Nissan should have replaced on warranty during the recall of 2007. I obtained the car on good faith that there were no faulty OEM parts. This was not true. How will Nissan respond to this situation?
 

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If the engine ever does run out of fuel you will destroy the fuel pump plus risk detonation within the combustion chamber
I've never heard of the second part regarding risking detonation in the combustion chamber. I'm sure tons of people have ran out of gas and never heard of that part. You got a source for that?

Regarding the fuel pump, I heard its not good because gunk and bits of crud could get into the system/engine/fuel pump/whatever, but I don't know how true that is either, but sound more reasonable/plausible.
 

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You may also damage your fuel injectors. I am sure you don't want to test your engine by draining almost all the fuel out and then race it on a highway and watch it coast to a stop when the last bit of gas is used up. Lean fuel mixtures definitely cause detonation so just as the car engine shuts down when the last gas is used up the motor will run lean. There doesn't seem to be a fail safe condition on the Altimas for a no gas situation There may not be any pinging or detonation but there is that small risk if you were accelerating when you ran out of gas. I wouldn't want to run out of gas on the down side of a big hill as you will find it extremely difficult to brake and steer especially on a curvy downhill. I wouldn't want to run out of gas with a diesel engine because of air getting into the injection pumps.
 

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I got 2 sets of HID lights for each side. high beam and low beam even though they are the same strength just aimed high for high beam and aimed low for low beam. The high beam aim is not much use in the city but may come in handy on a dark highway with a moose on the loose.
 

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I got my Altima2006 2.5l S with 68000 km on it Sept 2015. The all season tires on it were bald so I had to buy new summer tires. I had new metal sheet floorboards on both the passenger and drivers side put in to solve the Fred Flintstone problem. Now it has 75000 km or 45000 miles on it. Never had any DTC codes when I bought it and never had any since . The previous owner had the infamous reprogramming of the ECM done to disable the crankshaft position sensor on Dec 14. 2007 on the recall. However apart from the warranty maintenance done the previous owner never did anything else to the car. It had the original camshaft position sensor in it all those years. It was running too rich when I got it so I inspected the cats found them damaged and had them replaced along with the 2 O2 sensors. I got an oil change and put in synthetic Mobil1 5W-30 along with a synthetic oil filter. I put in a new air filter and flushed the brake fluid with new fluid. I changed the camshaft position sensor with the redesigned metal one from Nissan. The car took a little time to relearn the long term fuel mixture but now seems to purr like a kitten. I had the transmission pan taken off and replaced along with new gasket and the magnets cleaned. The mechanic told me that to get to the transmission filter he would have to take the transmission apart. I said no thanks. However I printed off the 2000 page FSM and cant find any mention of a transmission filter. It does have a metal strainer which I had cleaned. Probably the mechanic is correct but it certainly is not a serviceable item. What kind of designing is that? I had it drained twice and put in cheap DevronIII for 1st drain and Amsoil synthetic -60F automatic transmission fluid for final fill up. It took only 5 litres of that so I still have another 5 litres that I can use for my next drain. The question is how many km or miles should I go before draining and pouring in the remaining 5 litres? Another question is what is the cheapest test to tell me whether everything is working to 100% factory designed efficiency? Is there any way to tell if the motor is undamaged without taking the motor apart to actually inspect the cylinder walls?. I am still worried that all those years with the bad camshaft position sensor,the motor was damaged in some way by the infamous sucking back of catalytic materiel. The previous owner did not know about this stuff and only by reading stuff on this great site and others did I learn about it. Thanks for taking the time to give noobies like me the info we need. Altimas seem to be great cars but only if you keep them in perfect running order.
 

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Hello all. Just had a quick question. I have a 2003 Nissan Altima SE and I have actively been looking for an all aluminum radiator for it. Does anyone know where I can obtain one?
 

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Hello all. Just had a quick question. I have a 2003 Nissan Altima SE and I have actively been looking for an all aluminum radiator for it. Does anyone know where I can obtain one?
You might not find one for an Altima, but I believe 04+ Maxima uses the exact same radiator. So if you found an aftermarket aluminum one it *should* fit. Alot of aftermarket racing ones like that won't have fittings for the cooling lines for an automatic, so if your 3.5SE if auto you might be out of luck.
 

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2004 Altima 2.5s auto

Looking for some advice. On 7/1 I purchased a 2004 Altima 2.5S auto. 78k miles. Immaculate condition, 1 owner, garaged in winter.
I paid $6900 in Massachusetts. I know it was high, but I needed a car that day and this was the best one I found at 6 used lots.

Noticed the clunk sound right away thats supposed to be a from a cracked rear subframe/corroded bushing. I don't have any recalls on my VIN and Nissan says it is perfectly fine to leave this alone, I will just have the noise. Opinions on that? Should I try to get my used car dealer to fix it?

I found no rust from what I could see squeezing under the car without putting it up, in the rear or floorboard area, but other potential issues and reviews I've read make me nervous. Are these cars okay, or was it a mistake to buy a 2.5L?

Did I pay way too much? I'm still within 30 days of buying it.

Thanks in advance for any advice on this.
 

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Hi guys, purchased a 2006 Altima 2.5S last year with 145k kms on it. The car has been smooth so far and needs brake work and rotors replacement now. I went in for alignment yesterday and afterwards he mentioned that car needs the following things:
- All 4 brake pads
- Front rotors
- Driver side ball joint
- Tie rod

The car also makes squeaking sound on reverse when I apply brakes. Now parts here in Canada are expensive so I was planning to buy them from Amazon.com and have mechanic in Canada to put them.
I wanted to know that amazon.com does list parts by car year, make and model so is it reliable? Going to Long Island, NY in couple weeks where I will get the parts shipped :)
 

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2006 Altima 2.5S

Hi guys, purchased a 2006 Altima 2.5S last year with 145k kms on it. The car has been smooth so far and needs brake work and rotors replacement now. I went in for alignment yesterday and afterwards he mentioned that car needs the following things:
- All 4 brake pads
- Front rotors
- Driver side ball joint
- Tie rod

The car also makes squeaking sound on reverse when I apply brakes. Now parts here in Canada are expensive so I was planning to buy them from Amazon.com and have mechanic in Canada to put them.
I wanted to know that amazon.com does list parts by car year, make and model so is it reliable? Going to Long Island, NY in couple weeks where I will get the parts shipped :)
I hope you read my post 842.
 

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09 Altima 3.5SE 6MT Sedan
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Hi guys, purchased a 2006 Altima 2.5S last year with 145k kms on it. The car has been smooth so far and needs brake work and rotors replacement now. I went in for alignment yesterday and afterwards he mentioned that car needs the following things:
- All 4 brake pads
- Front rotors
- Driver side ball joint
- Tie rod

The car also makes squeaking sound on reverse when I apply brakes. Now parts here in Canada are expensive so I was planning to buy them from Amazon.com and have mechanic in Canada to put them.
I wanted to know that amazon.com does list parts by car year, make and model so is it reliable? Going to Long Island, NY in couple weeks where I will get the parts shipped :)
I know your pain. Have a look at RockAuto.com in addition to Amazon for aftermarket and Courtesy or Tasca for Nissan parts. Between these you can save a bundle over buying local. If you stay for 7 days, the $800 allowance saves you even more on the way back.
 

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Help wires hanging

Hi nice to talk to you guys - i have a 02 altima 2.5 and need help on 2 wires right behind the motor i dont know what they are to, here are the colors
1- red/orange
2-green /yellow
the pigtail is gone thanks for any help it is right behind the motor near the fire wall a lil to the right, "passenger" side
thanks thanks thanks

i hope i did this right lol
 

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Rear Suspension Bushings

Trying to follow protocol, posted in the members introduction and now I'm here (before starting a new thread)...

Bought my 16 yr old daughter her first car, a 2003 Altima for a whopping $750. Long story, but there isn't much wrong with the car and we've already fixed a couple of the 'normal' issues. One question I have, has anyone done much w/the rear suspension? I know we are needing rear shocks and lower shock bushings, but the back end tends to bounce around and step out to the right on larger road imperfections at 50+ MPH. To me this signals a change in alignment settings when the suspension cycles through its range of motion. A visual inspection shows a couple of the other bushings that look like they could use a replacement as well (torn rubber), but nothing that sticks out as being a major indicator of the problem. In fact an inspection by a local tire/suspension shop said they didn't see anything wrong and recommended an alignment to correct a rear toe issue.

On a side note, the rear subframe does look fairly new and seems to have previously been replaced under the recall (I am just judging by what I see) but I plan on calling the dealer this week to try and get confirmation on that.


Is there any aftermarket poly bushings available or are we stuck w/ stock replacements?

Thanks in advance if you can help.

(Pic from rear facing front of car, questionable bushings areas circled in yellow)
 

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Buying 03 altima se

Hi :)
I'm checking out a used 2003 Altima 3.5L SE tomorrow and was wondering what I need to know/look for on it? This is my first car so this is all very new to me. His asking price is $2.5k CAD. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
 

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Hi :)
I'm checking out a used 2003 Altima 3.5L SE tomorrow and was wondering what I need to know/look for on it? This is my first car so this is all very new to me. His asking price is $2.5k CAD. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Thank you!
Oil burning would be my #1 priority, but that's hard to check for unless the owner tells you up front. How many miles/km are on it? The passenger and/or drivers side floor pan might be rusty from a manufacturing defect. My driver's side was fine, passenger side I had to replace the metal because it was so bad. You should be able to see the rust from just looking under the car.

Normal car stuff, see if the oil level is ok, see if the transmission fluid smells burnt or looks black, check coolant level, condition of the brakes, etc.
 
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