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Personally I would only use the factory jack points approved by Nissan.
Is there a specific reason to not follow their advice?
This is a fairly new car. Why risk it?
Why would you use a factory jack point to lift the front of a 2018 Altima? The factory jack point is designed to only lift one corner of the car high enough off the ground to barely remove/install a tire.

Using the factory jack points to lift the entire front end of a 2018 Altima is the stupidest thing you can do. That metal which makes up the jack points is so weak. Take an Altima to any pro shop and watch how they lift it.........they totally avoid the weak factory jack points and go straight for the frame.

The jack points aren't designed to lift the front, the back, the left side or the right side of the car off the ground.
 

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It's getting where so much emphasis is placed now on removing weight to get more mileage that jacking up any car now is a risk, the frame members themselves are getting thinner and thinner in metal thickness.

Think I'm not right? Jack your car up even using the factory point and up say tire six inches clear of the ground and then open and close the door nearest that jacking point, the door will actually typically be tighter at the hinge from the car warping because it is jacked up. It may not even unlatch from the jamb properly when car is jacked up, seen it more than once, the door hangs up opening it. The frame itself is warping there. Modern cars are only dead straight when all FOUR wheels are on the ground supporting the weight correctly.

As an aside, the roofs are weaker too. I had an old MII Mustang and sitting next to a new '93 Topaz when a hundred year record hailstorm came. The MII had dents all in it but the Topaz was so bad the entire roofline lowered to be about 2 inches lower in the middle, the MII at least kept the original roof profile line. Subsequent investigation showed the Topaz roof metal to be much thinner than the MII roof was.

Later on I learned you could bend the Tempo series car hoods BY HAND to re-line them up with the fenders, the metal being that thin. I had several of the cars.

That is why most cars now use sheet metal in body panels that is HSS steel rather than mild steel, HSS is stiffer because it has been hardened slightly.
 
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