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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
my tranny goes in but when reaching the wall it doesn't reach. Can't put my bolts in. it's short about 1.1/2 inches and my flywheel sticks out about the same. Is it even the right flywheel? SPEC FLYWHEEL, CLUTCH AND PRESSURE PLATE. I have pics. Can anybody help me. PLEASE!!!
 

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Looks like you have the flywheel on backwards....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
But I didn't see any bolts on the other side of the fly wheel. Thanks I was just thinking about that. :crying
 

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Looks like your gonna have to go back in....sorry. I know its soooo frustrating. Keep us informed to yur findings, please.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info, I really appreciate you. One more question, I bought the new brake master cylinder for manual transmission. From the pedal to the tranny and reservoir. what about the clutch piping that swirls around and it's metal, does that get connected where in the cylinder? Or do I have to add a t? 1 going down to the swirly piping and the other way for the brakes. any info would be helpful. I'm really trying to finish this project. Thanks ahead of time
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
this spec flywheel is the wrong flywheel it's for 3.5! I new I wasn't a herb!!! One way plate. thanks guys
 

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One more question, I bought the new brake master cylinder for manual transmission. From the pedal to the tranny and reservoir. what about the clutch piping that swirls around and it's metal, does that get connected where in the cylinder? Or do I have to add a t?
Back in an earlier thread when you asked about the fluid reservoir, I should have mentioned my webpage for my car, which is the link in my signature. If you scroll down, it shows the supply hose from the fluid reservoir (on a factory M/T car) to the clutch master cylinder. In the second picture, the black supply hose is hidden directly behind the words "master cylinder (hard-to-reach)", but you can still faintly make out its outline.

But it sounds like your question today is about the piping between the clutch master cylinder and the clutch slave cylinder. For the longest time, I never understood why they had that long coil of piping in the path. My theory now is that it's probably there to allow the engine to move around on the motor mounts. My other car (a DSM) has no such coil; they just have a place where the clutch fluid goes through a rubber hose, like with any brake line. A common aftermarket upgrade for cars like that is to use a replacement hose with stainless-steel braiding. Nissan's way of doing it on the Altima could give you hard metal piping the whole way through (maybe?).

I would have expected the service manual to have a pictorial diagram that shows the coiled section. But I just looked (in CL.PDF) and didn't see such a thing. On page CL-12 (in my 2009 manual) there's a schematic diagram, but it doesn't show what part of the line the coil is in. It's been a while since I've actually looked at that area on my car, and I'm feeling lazy tonight and it's already dark out, so I'm not gonna look at it today either.

One thing I don't like about Nissan's clutch lines is that it's quite a long dead-end path to the slave cylinder. The result is that when you do a fluid flush, that section will still have old fluid in it. Some other manufacturers that use concentric slave cylinders, such as GM, have two pipes going into the slave cylinder, and the extra one is where you bleed it from. To make up for that, I just get my clutch fluid flushed/replaced more often on the Altima than would be otherwise needed on most cars.

I'm pretty sure that any clutch master cylinder would have just two connections on it. One for the supply, and one to go to the slave cylinder.
 

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I knew I had seen a diagram of that coiled tubing somewhere...

First, some photos that I took, when I was wondering what the coil was for...




And now, the pictorial diagram(s) I was thinking of. I got these from the parts department at the dealer.


PS: From looking at this diagram, I still can't tell where the tee goes. Now I'm curious. If someone knows, please mention it.
 

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OK, today I went out and looked at the actual car. I also read about the bleeding procedure (I wasn't familiar with the procedure myself, since on the Altima I always get that done at the dealer).

There are two places that bleeding is done from. The first one (and the one that the manual tells you to do first) is right near the slave cylinder. The second one is the brass fitting that I labeled "What's this?" in one of my photos. That brass fitting connects to the top end of the coiled pipe.

I think I was wrong about the coiled pipe being a way to allow for engine motion. The coiled pipe is just there to create the second bleed line. I have no idea why they decided there was a need for more than one place to bleed it.

From looking at the car, I still couldn't see the tee. I think the airbox blocks the view of it.
 
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