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Hey guys, i'm new here so hopefully this thread is in the right place. I recently bought a 2006 Altima SE. I love the VQ35 by the way! It has 225,000 miles. Normally i wouldnt by something with that high of miles but i needed something cheap and it was in imaculate shape. It had 60+ service records in Carfax all done at the dealer so i figured it was safe. 6 montgs down and so far so good. Since it had high miles i want to do some maintenance to make sure it lasts a lot longer. I am planning on tearing her apart to check valve clearance and replace some shims if needed. According to Carfax this has never been done. Its not knocking but there is a really faint valve noise so i figured i might as well check them. Anyways, my question is, while i have it opened up, is there anything else i should replace while i am in there, either for longevity reasons or for some added performance? Im not looking to spend $1200 to replace my cams but a couple hundred would be ok. Maybe new valves or springs, etc. Also, i have heard this engine is starved for air due to the intake design. Is that because the cold air intake or is it more the intake manifold? I figured i would do the intake at the same time as the valves but am wondering if i should replace the manifold or just do a CIA? Thanks for all your help!
 

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Hey guys, i'm new here so hopefully this thread is in the right place. I recently bought a 2006 Altima SE. I love the VQ35 by the way! It has 225,000 miles. Normally i wouldnt by something with that high of miles but i needed something cheap and it was in imaculate shape. It had 60+ service records in Carfax all done at the dealer so i figured it was safe. 6 montgs down and so far so good. Since it had high miles i want to do some maintenance to make sure it lasts a lot longer. I am planning on tearing her apart to check valve clearance and replace some shims if needed. According to Carfax this has never been done. Its not knocking but there is a really faint valve noise so i figured i might as well check them. Anyways, my question is, while i have it opened up, is there anything else i should replace while i am in there, either for longevity reasons or for some added performance? Im not looking to spend $1200 to replace my cams but a couple hundred would be ok. Maybe new valves or springs, etc. Also, i have heard this engine is starved for air due to the intake design. Is that because the cold air intake or is it more the intake manifold? I figured i would do the intake at the same time as the valves but am wondering if i should replace the manifold or just do a CIA? Thanks for all your help!
More than likely the ticking noise you are hearing is from the timing chain tensioner. You can not replace valves without removing the cylinder head. You are working on the wrong side of the cylinder head to remove valves.
 

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Thanks for the advice on the timing chain tensioner. I know its a bit more work to get to the valves. Im assuming the camshafts have to be removed to get to the valve shims, right? If i have to go that far i figured i might as well take off the head and replace the head gasket since that has never been done and possibly the valves too, if you think its a good idea for longevity. Maybe piston rings too... Or maybe im just thinking too much into it.
 

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VALVE ADJUSTING

CAUTION:
Adjust valve clearance while engine is cold.

NOTE:



  • Perform adjustment by selecting the correct head thickness of the valve lifter (adjusting shims are not used).
  • The specified valve lifter thickness is the dimension at normal temperatures. Ignore dimensional differences caused by temperature. Use specifications for hot engine condition to confirm valve clearances.
  1. Remove the camshaft.
  2. Remove the valve lifter that was measured as being outside the standard specifications.
  3. Measure the center thickness of the removed lifter with a micrometer, as shown.
  4. Use the equation below to calculate the replacement valve lifter thickness.
  5. Valve lifter thickness calculation equation: t = t1 + (C1 - C2)
    t = thickness of the replacement lifter t1 = thickness of the removed lifter
    C1 = measured valve clearance
    C2 = standard valve clearance



    • The thickness of the new valve lifter can be identified by the stamp mark on the reverse side (inside the lifter).
    • Available thickness of the valve lifter (factory setting): 7.88 - 8.40 mm (0.3102 - 0.3307 in) , in 0.02 mm (0.0008 in)
  6. increments, in 27 sizes (intake / exhaust). Refer to See: Engine, Cooling and Exhaust\Engine\Specifications\Cylinder Head.

    1. Install the selected replacement valve lifter.
    2. Install the camshaft.
    3. Rotate the crankshaft a few turns by hand.
    4. Confirm that the valve clearances are within specification.
    5. After the engine has been run to full operating temperature, confirm that the valve clearances are within specification.
    6. Have Fun.
 
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